Hey Creators, Are Your Viral Parties Really Worth the Risk?

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So you’re a creator that’s been in lockdown for months and you get invited to a party that we have all heard about. You go, and you have such an amazing time hanging out with your friends that you do what you do best, you film it and upload it to your platform of choice. The views start rolling in, and a huge number of your fans not only see the fun you’re having, but they also see you’ve made the decision to break free from the pandemic rules. Hey, if you can party like there’s no tomorrow, perhaps they can too, except there may not be a tomorrow.

As a result, one of your viewers follows your lead and, unfortunately, contracts COVID-19. They then transmit it to their grandparent who lives with them. The grandparent passes away. Distraught by the results of their actions, your fan reaches out to you and says that seeing your video is the reason they decided to party with their friends. How are you going to deal with that? Knowing that your actions had very real consequences?

View Counts Have A Way Of Obscuring The Human Cost Of Your Actions

The COVID-19 pandemic is still very real, but you wouldn’t know that from some of the content being created now. As a creator or influencer, or whatever you would like to call yourself, you have a responsibility not only yourself but to your fans, employees, friends, and family to not be publishing any content on any platform showing you flouting the rules that everyone else has to follow. That means openly attending or hosting parties, refusing to wear a face mask, and not adhering to the CDC / WHO guidelines.

I’m not saying this is an easy change to make. YouTube reported that ad revenue on the platform dropped by $3.8 billion in Q2, which translates into lost revenue for content creators, missed meet-ups, and canceled events. But the fight for viewers and revenue doesn’t mean you must sacrifice your beliefs or risk the lives of your viewers and fellow creators.

It is easy to forget how many people look up to you. In many cases, your audience may  look like views on a video or story, but these are real people. I work with creators, many of whom forget there are actual people behind those numbers. The numbers and power of your influence are truly remarkable.

If you want to understand the scope of how many lives you affect, then think about it this way:

You have 1 million subs/views/likes/comments on your content in the last 28 days. That may be a small number compared to your channel, but just go with me on it. Let’s pick Madison Square Garden:

That is a sold out show at MSG – the maximum amount of people MSG can hold: 20,789. Yeah, that’s it.

That means that if we take your million subs/ views / likes/ comments in just 28 days you filled 48 Madison Square Gardens. Look at that picture and try to imagine 48 of those filled with people watching you.

As a creator, you have a decision to make. Do you want to be part of the solution or part of the problem? You may argue that’s not your problem, that you cannot control your fans. And you are absolutely correct. But you can control what you upload and say. You have the ability to save lives.

Following Best Practices Around Social Distancing Is More Than Good Ethics, It’s Good Business

I hope the above gives you more perspective on what you are dealing with. Hearing people say, “I just want to live my life” is not an excuse when by your actions, you “just wanting to live your life” may be taking someone else’s away. You have a responsibility to your fans to set an example. Because sooner or later, some of you will come to the realization that you enabled someone who did not deserve to die.

We are all having a hard time adjusting to this “new normal” and want it to be over. I think everyone can agree with that sentiment. This desire to move on and just get over it is seen in stories highlighting illegal gatherings and “COVID” parties. The creators at the center of these stories have risked their lives–and the lives of their viewers–along with their livelihoods through their actions. If you really wanted this over with, you would use your influence to slow the spread so things can get back to normal. Your actions are just the opposite.

Furthermore, you are in business, you get money for people watching, buying merch, brand deals, etc., how are your fans, with massive unemployment going to afford to buy any of your merch? How are brands and companies going to make enough money to stay afloat to even be able to offer you brand deals? They will not. And you will not be making the money you deserve for your hard work, if we do not get COVID under control.

You now have more reach than most companies, especially when it comes to younger viewers who are also the people contracting COVID-19 at higher rates now.  By setting the example and not having parties or getting together and sharing it, or better yet, condemning it, you are actually helping your business – including human kind. You have 48 Madison Square Gardens of people that could listen to you. Why not use your influence to tell them to stay inside so we all can get back to some sort of normalcy.

Adapting To This New Normal Requires A New Attitude

This “new normal” whatever it is going to be, is going to be hard, and right now, it is hard to even deal with on a daily basis. All my clients I talk to are struggling, and I know you are too. We are in this together. We are all scared. But ignoring the pandemic, and pretending everything is “normal” is ignorant. It is not going to help you or the world.

Business Insider had a great article in early July where they talked with Dr. Christina Ghaly, Los Angeles County’s director of health services. Who said “”If you’re an influencer or have the ability to influence people in any space whether you’re a celebrity or on the internet — whatever your sphere of influence — please take that responsibility seriously… …Please use that as a chance to be a role model.”

I am not asking you to suffer any more than you already have. Nor am I asking you to stop making content that makes millions of people happy. You are a creator. You are a leader. Time to get creative on how to adjust to being safe and spreading that message. If you need help with navigating this unprecedented time, how to integrate being safe, but still making kick-ass content, reach out, that is my job, to help you.

Bottom line: If you are out or having parties and posting it, you are killing people. Be ready to deal with the consequences of that.


Josh is an ICF Certified Life Coach and the founder of Creator Coach, the first-ever life coach dedicated exclusively to creators, and now the people that surround them. He’s helped clients who have a reach of over 2+ billion viewers across all platforms. And he has been featured in The New York Times, Slate, ForbesTubeFilter, 6 Feet Apart with Alex Wagner (NBC and ShowTime), where Alex stated: “We all need a Josh Zimmerman Life Coach in our lives…”, moderated panels for Playlist Live, Patreon, and VidConNow. You can learn more about him by visiting his website: www.creatorcoach.com

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Half A Million People Watched Dr. DisRespect’s First Post-Permaban Live Stream On YouTube

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More than 500,000 people tuned in for Dr. DisRespect’s first live stream since he was banned from Twitch in late June.

The 38-year-old streamer (real name Guy Beahm) went live this afternoon on YouTube, and spent an hour fielding questions from viewers before streaming Call of Duty gameplay.

Unsurprisingly, chief among viewers’ queries was why Beahm was abruptly and apparently unappealably shut out of Twitch. Prior to his ban, he was one of the platform’s most prominent partner creators, fresh off signing a reported multimillion-dollar deal to stream there exclusively for years to come. Beahm appeared to receive news of his incoming ban on camera; the final moments of his last Twitch stream show him getting a message on his phone, becoming visibly distressed, and ending the broadcast without warning. Shortly after, he released a statement saying he didn’t know why Twitch had banned him.

Today, he said that still hasn’t changed. “In regards to the ban, there’s a lot of people that want to know what happened,” he told viewers. “Guess what? I want you to look me in my f—–g eyes when I say this: We still have no idea. We have no idea.”

He mocked people who claimed he’s lying, calling them “a bunch of phonies,” then added, “As far as I’m concerned, we didn’t do anything to warrant a ban, let alone how they went about banning us. No communication before, no reaching out, nothing. Boom. Done…I think it’s a f—–g cockroach approach. Period. Last thing I’m gonna say about it.”

Beahm went on to say that he doesn’t want to speak about it publicly because his “legal professionals” are doing “what they need to do.” He did seem to confirm that his deal with Twitch was valuable: “You’re talking about a heavy contract. Lots of money. I got a mansion with an infinity pool and geysers that come out of cement tiles every time you walk. It has LED lights. There’s big money involved.”

As for whether Beahm is streaming on YouTube because of a signed deal, that doesn’t seem likely. After Beahm linked to the channel yesterday, hinting at a return, people noticed he had activated Channel Memberships–something only creators in the YouTube Partner Program can do–and theorized that he’s YouTube Gaming’s newest exclusive streamer. But unlike at Twitch, Beahm can be a YouTube Partner without having an actual YouTube Gaming contract.

During the broadcast, Beahm indicated his move to YouTube was spontaneous. “What are we playing today? I don’t know. What are we talking about? I don’t know. Why am I livestreaming right now? I don’t know. I just thought I’d start a stream up,” he said.

Beahm likely isn’t able to sign with a new platform until his Twitch deal has been untangled, but just in case, Tubefilter has reached out to YouTube to ask if Beahm has a contract with it. We’ll update this story with any new information.

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Half A Million People Watched Dr. DisRespect’s First Post-Permaban Live Stream On YouTube

  • Post category:Other

More than 500,000 people tuned in for Dr. DisRespect’s first live stream since he was banned from Twitch in late June.

The 38-year-old streamer (real name Guy Beahm) went live this afternoon on YouTube, and spent an hour fielding questions from viewers before streaming Call of Duty gameplay.

Unsurprisingly, chief among viewers’ queries was why Beahm was abruptly and apparently unappealably shut out of Twitch. Prior to his ban, he was one of the platform’s most prominent partner creators, fresh off signing a reported multimillion-dollar deal to stream there exclusively for years to come. Beahm appeared to receive news of his incoming ban on camera; the final moments of his last Twitch stream show him getting a message on his phone, becoming visibly distressed, and ending the broadcast without warning. Shortly after, he released a statement saying he didn’t know why Twitch had banned him.

Today, he said that still hasn’t changed. “In regards to the ban, there’s a lot of people that want to know what happened,” he told viewers. “Guess what? I want you to look me in my f—–g eyes when I say this: We still have no idea. We have no idea.”

He mocked people who claimed he’s lying, calling them “a bunch of phonies,” then added, “As far as I’m concerned, we didn’t do anything to warrant a ban, let alone how they went about banning us. No communication before, no reaching out, nothing. Boom. Done…I think it’s a f—–g cockroach approach. Period. Last thing I’m gonna say about it.”

Beahm went on to say that he doesn’t want to speak about it publicly because his “legal professionals” are doing “what they need to do.” He did seem to confirm that his deal with Twitch was valuable: “You’re talking about a heavy contract. Lots of money. I got a mansion with an infinity pool and geysers that come out of cement tiles every time you walk. It has LED lights. There’s big money involved.”

As for whether Beahm is streaming on YouTube because of a signed deal, that doesn’t seem likely. After Beahm linked to the channel yesterday, hinting at a return, people noticed he had activated Channel Memberships–something only creators in the YouTube Partner Program can do–and theorized that he’s YouTube Gaming’s newest exclusive streamer. But unlike at Twitch, Beahm can be a YouTube Partner without having an actual YouTube Gaming contract.

During the broadcast, Beahm indicated his move to YouTube was spontaneous. “What are we playing today? I don’t know. What are we talking about? I don’t know. Why am I livestreaming right now? I don’t know. I just thought I’d start a stream up,” he said.

Beahm likely isn’t able to sign with a new platform until his Twitch deal has been untangled, but just in case, Tubefilter has reached out to YouTube to ask if Beahm has a contract with it. We’ll update this story with any new information.

Visit Tubefilter for more great stories.

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TV tonight: our highlights for Saturday 8th August

  • Post category:Netflix

Total Wipeout: Freddie & Paddy Takeover is just one of the gems on today…

TV tonight Total Wipeout: Freddie & Paddy Takeover

Total Wipeout is back, with some familiar faces commentating, Dylan confronts Lev in Casualty, and Stephen Mulhern presents new game show Rolling In It. Here’s what you shouldn’t miss on TV tonight. 

  • Our hand-selected recommendations for what’s on TV tonight include three TV shows, a film, live sport and the latest trending need-to-binge-on-now box set 
  • For more information about what’s on TV tonight see our TV Guide 

What’s on TV tonight 

Our expert TV journalists have picked the best things on TV tonight… 

Best TV shows on TV tonight

Casualty, 8.40pm, BBC1

TV tonight Casualty

Dylan is furious with Lev

Some things can’t be unseen, and Dylan is still reeling from spotting Lev passionately kissing an unknown man! Lev is married to Faith, who Dr D just happens to be in love with… Tonight Dylan tells Lev ‘I Know What You Did Last Saturday’ and Lev counters with soap’s ‘Four Stages of Getting Caught Cheating (denial, threats, pushy-shovey, tearful begging)’. You may be surprised where your sympathies lie… Elsewhere, viewers witness David’s heartbreaking ordeal when he was sectioned in 2017. Jason Durr’s performance is haunting. 

★★★★ ER

Total Wipeout: Freddie & Paddy Takeover, 7.10pm, BBC1

TV tonight Total Wipeout: Freddie & Paddy Takeover

Bottoms up! The big red balls are back

Cast your mind back to 2009 when complete strangers would think nothing of flying to Buenos Aires to take part in an outlandish, oversized water assault course in a bid to win £10,000. Relive the magic tonight when Freddie Flintoff and Paddy McGuinness gleefully revisit this madcap show – originally presented by Richard Hammond and Amanda Byram – that, amazingly, ran for five series. Expect plenty of innuendos about big balls, puns beyond number, contestant bravado and, most importantly of all, many, many falls. Harmless (well, for viewers at least) fun… 

★★ ER

Rolling In It, 6.25pm, ITV

TV tonight Rolling In It

High roller: Jennie McAlpine guests tonight

It seems like we haven’t had a new game show in forever but, never fear, Stephen Mulhern is here with this brand new one, which sees three celebs each help a member of the public win a large cash prize, simply by rolling a coin.  In this first show, Coronation Street stars Antony Cotton, Jennie McAlpine and Sair Khan try their best to help their partners scoop the jackpot. Antony is really competitive – but will it pay off? We all need a bit of fun in our lives at the minute, and this is just the ticket. 

★★★ VW

Best box set to watch on TV tonight

Kingdom, seasons 1-3, Netflix

Mixed martial arts drama with tough fight scenes and involving storylines. Ex-fighter and gym owner Alvey Kulina (Frank Grillo) trains fighters alongside his two sons – Nate (Nick Jonas), who’s secretly gay, and hard-partying Jay (Jonathan Tucker).

Best film to watch on TV tonight

The Revenant, 9pm, BBC2

TV tonight The Revenant

Leonardo DiCaprio in his first Oscar-winning role

Taken as an incredible journey through a frozen wilderness beset with dangers, Alejandro Iñárritu’s revenge tale set on the Frontier of the 1820s is simply astonishing. Leonardo DiCaprio is a guide for fur-trappers, who is left for dead after being savaged by a bear. His virtually wordless ordeal of trying to survive is portrayed in a ridiculously realistic fashion and the only quibble is the rather sanctimonious, heavy-handed spiritual subtext. It’s a small gripe, as this is ultimately an astounding piece of cinema. 

Live sport

  • Champions League Football: Bayern Munich v Chelsea 7pm (k-o 8pm), BT Sport 1
  • Snooker World Championship 1.15pm, BBC1

If you watch just one thing on TV tonight… 

Don’t miss Total Wipeout: Freddie & Paddy Takeover on TV tonight – epic fails and big red balls

Not found anything you want to watch on TV tonight? Check out our TV Guide. 

Happy viewing!

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DigiTour Co-Founder Meridith Rojas Named Logitech’s Global Head Of Creator Marketing

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Noted digital media entrepreneur Meridith Rojas has joined Swiss computer peripherals manufacturer Logitech as its global head of creator marketing.

In this role, Rojas — who co-founded and served as CEO of DigiTour, a producer of live events featuring social media talent — will focus on helping to shape Logitech’s relationships with Gen Z, working with gaming and entertainment brands and tapping into her longstanding relationships with digital creators. In addition to driving creator marketing initiatives, Rojas will be tasked with identifying key partnerships alongside both established and aspiring creators, and seeking to better understand how Logitech can support their needs.

Rojas will report to Vincet Borel, GM of Logitech’s new business group.

Logitech notes that creators have been an crucial component of its marketing efforts, given that many creators harness its gear and software. Most recently, the company teamed with several creators — including makeup artist Kimberly Margarita, musician Yvette Young, and gamer Meg Kaylee — on a campaign called #StartAFollowing. Logitech G, a division dedicated to gaming products, also hosts a monthly series called #CreatorSpotlight that aims to build a more diverse and inclusive gaming community.

“I’m excited to join a company like Logitech that embraces creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship,” Rojas said in a statement. “I feel it’s a place I can build and grow and hopefully make a dent. Logitech and I share a commitment to supporting and empowering the creator community — I look forward to what’s ahead.”

As she joins Logitech, Rojas will continue to serve as entrepreneur-in-residence at Columbia Records, where she helped launch the kid and influencer-focused music brand Jam Jr., and also helped incubate girl group Run The World. She has also helped Columbia launch national partnerships with Walmart, tween girls’ clother Justice, and The Girl Scouts.

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DigiTour Co-Founder Meridith Rojas Named Logitech’s Global Head Of Creator Marketing

  • Post category:Other

Noted digital media entrepreneur Meridith Rojas has joined Swiss computer peripherals manufacturer Logitech as its global head of creator marketing.

In this role, Rojas — who co-founded and served as CEO of DigiTour, a producer of live events featuring social media talent — will focus on helping to shape Logitech’s relationships with Gen Z, working with gaming and entertainment brands and tapping into her longstanding relationships with digital creators. In addition to driving creator marketing initiatives, Rojas will be tasked with identifying key partnerships alongside both established and aspiring creators, and seeking to better understand how Logitech can support their needs.

Rojas will report to Vincet Borel, GM of Logitech’s new business group.

Logitech notes that creators have been an crucial component of its marketing efforts, given that many creators harness its gear and software. Most recently, the company teamed with several creators — including makeup artist Kimberly Margarita, musician Yvette Young, and gamer Meg Kaylee — on a campaign called #StartAFollowing. Logitech G, a division dedicated to gaming products, also hosts a monthly series called #CreatorSpotlight that aims to build a more diverse and inclusive gaming community.

“I’m excited to join a company like Logitech that embraces creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship,” Rojas said in a statement. “I feel it’s a place I can build and grow and hopefully make a dent. Logitech and I share a commitment to supporting and empowering the creator community — I look forward to what’s ahead.”

As she joins Logitech, Rojas will continue to serve as entrepreneur-in-residence at Columbia Records, where she helped launch the kid and influencer-focused music brand Jam Jr., and also helped incubate girl group Run The World. She has also helped Columbia launch national partnerships with Walmart, tween girls’ clother Justice, and The Girl Scouts.

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Facebook Watch Unveils ‘Stereoscope,’ Its Next Crypt TV Original

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Facebook Watch has cut back on scripted originals this year, but it’s still making room for more Crypt TV.

The digital horror studio linked up with Facebook last year in one of Watch’s largest content production deals to date: a five-series slate of 10-episode exclusives. Now, Facebook has picked up a sixth show, with plans to make it Crypt TV’s first internationally distributed Watch original.

Based on Crypt TV’s 2017 short film of the same name, Stereoscope follows the titular ocular device as it wreaks havoc on the lives of those who dare entrust their peepers to its otherworldly powers. After the scientist (played by Brian White) handling it dies mysteriously, his wife (Prema Cruz) and daughter (Bree Winslow) must come together to discover what the stereoscope is–and what it’s capable of.

“Our partnership with Facebook Watch is built on turning our best performing IP on our pages to long-form shows,” Darren Brandl, Crypt TV’s, said in a statement. “Stereoscope is a story our fans have been demanding to see more of, and we can’t wait to see their reaction.” (Crypt TV and Facebook’s first original, The Birch, is similarly based on a previous short film. Facebook renewed that series for a second season just over a month ago.)

Stereoscope is an English-language production, but will be subtitled and distributed on Crypt TV’s Facebook Pages for speakers of Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Hindi, and Indonesian. The studio says it has more than 10 million followers across its various Pages.

Brandl added that Stereoscope’s debut will “kick off 50 consecutive weeks of new original scary programming, exclusive to our Facebook pages.” This content is not part of its deal with Facebook; Crypt TV has for years used the social network to boost its own originals. Forthcoming programming includes productions from Crypt TV’s new partnerships with Mumbai-based Abundantia Entertainment and Sony Screen Gems.

Stereoscope premieres Aug. 21.

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Facebook Watch Unveils ‘Stereoscope,’ Its Next Crypt TV Original

  • Post category:Other

Facebook Watch has cut back on scripted originals this year, but it’s still making room for more Crypt TV.

The digital horror studio linked up with Facebook last year in one of Watch’s largest content production deals to date: a five-series slate of 10-episode exclusives. Now, Facebook has picked up a sixth show, with plans to make it Crypt TV’s first internationally distributed Watch original.

Based on Crypt TV’s 2017 short film of the same name, Stereoscope follows the titular ocular device as it wreaks havoc on the lives of those who dare entrust their peepers to its otherworldly powers. After the scientist (played by Brian White) handling it dies mysteriously, his wife (Prema Cruz) and daughter (Bree Winslow) must come together to discover what the stereoscope is–and what it’s capable of.

“Our partnership with Facebook Watch is built on turning our best performing IP on our pages to long-form shows,” Darren Brandl, Crypt TV’s, said in a statement. “Stereoscope is a story our fans have been demanding to see more of, and we can’t wait to see their reaction.” (Crypt TV and Facebook’s first original, The Birch, is similarly based on a previous short film. Facebook renewed that series for a second season just over a month ago.)

Stereoscope is an English-language production, but will be subtitled and distributed on Crypt TV’s Facebook Pages for speakers of Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Hindi, and Indonesian. The studio says it has more than 10 million followers across its various Pages.

Brandl added that Stereoscope’s debut will “kick off 50 consecutive weeks of new original scary programming, exclusive to our Facebook pages.” This content is not part of its deal with Facebook; Crypt TV has for years used the social network to boost its own originals. Forthcoming programming includes productions from Crypt TV’s new partnerships with Mumbai-based Abundantia Entertainment and Sony Screen Gems.

Stereoscope premieres Aug. 21.

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Insights: Microsoft Intercepts TikTok Political Football, Despite Facebook’s Game Plan

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So, Microsoft wants to get into the business of social media. Real social media, not just the business of business-oriented social media. The tech giant’s executives must have been feeling left out of last week’s Congressional hearings featuring nearly six hours of posturing by pols and bland responses by CEOs from Apple, Alphabet, Amazon, and Facebook.

Of course, the day after their penalty-box appearances before Congress, those other four tech giants also reported huge quarterly earnings, with combined profits of around $29 billion for the quarter. If the Faustian price of that vast well of profits is an occasional day with the House Judiciary Committee, well, as Donald Trump put it regarding what was then 154,000 U.S. coronavirus deaths, “It is what it is.”

Still there are reasons why this makes sense for Microsoft. For instance, Morgan Stanley analyst Keith Weiss called the TikTok acquisition “a compelling fit” for Microsoft, because:

  • With 100 million U.S. users, TikTok would “immediately make Microsoft a viable player in the consumer-oriented social media space,” Weiss wrote in a research note. TikTok certainly is the hot newcomer giving The Zuckerbeast night sweats. After killing off failed TikTok clone Lasso at Facebook, subsidiary Instagram launched another copycat, Reels, this week in more than 50 countries. It’s counting on Reels and its Instagram integration to blunt TikTok’s surging popularity.
  • More surprisingly, to me anyway, Microsoft also could wring a lot more cash out of TikTok, Weiss wrote. Currently, the average revenue per user is paltry–less than $5. Microsoft, whose market capitalization sits north of $1.6 trillion, knows a little bit about extracting value from software.
  • Microsoft is best positioned to buy/rescue TikTok. There’s that $1.6 trillion valuation for one thing, and a cash hoard of $136 billion. Even if buying TikTok costs as much as $30 billion, per some reports, Microsoft could easily pay for it, and still have money to buy coffee for members of the entire House Judiciary Committee.
  • Just as important as wallet size is Microsoft’s acceptability to people on several sides of this conversation. Microsoft was the trillion-dollar tech company that wasn’t summoned before Congress. It doesn’t have issues with regulators over monopoly-power abuses (at least not in the last couple of decades). It even is likely the easiest company for Chinese regulators, investors, and nationalists to accept. Microsoft is highly esteemed in China, where it has had a presence for more than a quarter century. Over that time, it’s fostered a lot of goodwill, and sprinkled alumni throughout the country’s tech sector. Even ByteDance, TikTok’s parent company, was founded by a Microsoft alum, Zhang Yiming.

And there are other reasons that this acquisition will make sense once the dust settles from the purchase, regulatory approvals, and technical unwinding of the sold pieces from the rest of TikTok.

How Microsoft can integrate TikTok into Minecraft and more

To start with, given their hugely overlapping core demographics, integrating TikTok into Minecraft is a no-brainer. Minecraft has been one of the biggest sources of YouTube content for years now; transferring at least a portion of that video creation and audience directly to TikTok could be huge.

And what about Microsoft’s long-dominant PC operating system and related hardware? Could TikTok functionality be wired directly into Windows 10, and optimized in Surface laptops and tablets, perhaps with improved webcams or other consumer hardware?

Speaking of hardware integrations, Microsoft has spent a lot of money developing the HoloLens and related “mixed reality” immersive entertainment technologies. Could a marriage with TikTok ease the process of building short mixed-reality content for the next generation of creators on platforms beyond the PC and smartphone?

Closer to home, a big opportunity sits out there with Microsoft’s Xbox, which launches its next generation of consoles later this year, and Windows-based PCs. It’s also about to launch xCloud, a streaming game service on Android that’s designed to compete with Google‘s Stadia. Simplifying the output of gameplay videos from any of those platforms into TikTok could be a win-win, and a potentially compelling way to make up for Microsoft’s decision a month ago to kill Mixer, its Twitch competitor.

I’m less certain about how TikTok might integrate with LinkedIn, that business-facing social-media service Microsoft bought a few years back for $26 billion. The difference between buttoned-down posts about supply chains and marketing plans on the one hand, and dance routines and pratfall videos on the other, is huge.

But maybe it could work. LinkedIn has become a convenient successor for business cards, especially during the Zoom-addled pandemic and lockdown. The site is a vital resource for job seekers, employers, and recruiters. But LinkedIn hasn’t really innovated much since becoming part of Microsoft. The service has been smartly integrated with Outlook and other Microsoft services, but otherwise seems to have been largely left alone.

Maybe adding business-minded TikTok videos can become another way for people to showcase themselves and their talents on LinkedIn. It would still be a stretch, but I’m guessing the growing tribe of LinkedIn influencers out there hope they soon get a chance to figure it out.

TikTok was ready to take off. Then this happened.

TikTok has been positioned to take off this year. The company promised to spend up to $2 billion over the next three years to support creator monetization, half of that in the United States. It also promised to create 10,000 new U.S. jobs, and was looking for a new international headquarters, with New York and Los Angeles among possible locations. In his note, Weiss projected the company will generate $1 billion in revenue this year, and as much as $6 billion worldwide in 2021, half that from U.S. operations.

Basically, it’s turning into a formidable, deep-pocketed competitor for Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, and other, more established services with far more resources than the typical wannabe startup.

All that makes President Trump’s antipathy with the site–allegedly over “national security” but more likely over the role K-pop TikTok fans played in undermining his disastrous Tulsa political rally earlier in the summer–and Mark Zuckerberg‘s interests nicely aligned. Facebook can’t buy or bury TikTok, two of its time-tested tactics, and one cloning operation has already died. Reels, the new clone, seems fine, and well positioned for success as a new tab on Instagram. We’ll see whether users take advantage in large numbers.

Perhaps Zuckerberg’s newest playbook maneuver is to stir up enough political blowback to hamstring threatening burgeoning competition. He’s certainly not above that sort of strategy, given his long history of unscrupulous dealing with challengers. If nothing else, the distractions and sales talk guarantee TikTok executives will continue to be scattered for months.

As it is, lots of questions still need to be answered:

  • Why is Microsoft taking only the TikTok operations in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, but not England or Ireland?
  • What exactly will Microsoft be getting when it buys those parts of TikTok? Does it get to keep the secret-sauce algorithm that so effortlessly serves up the just the right next video? What will be the relationship with the remaining parts of TikTok in other countries, or with Douyin, ByteDance’s Chinese version of TikTok?
  • What will creators think of a bifurcated service? Do they lose access to their overseas audiences? Facebook is waving large checks in front of some TikTok stars already, and Snapchat is adding some TikTok-like functionality. Will TikSoft be able to retain most of its talent?
  • Is Microsoft really ready for the ramped-up scrutiny it will face over issues such as marketing to minors, culling hate speech and conspiracy theories, and quelling antitrust concerns?

TikTok was having one of the most remarkable years in the brief history of social media. I’ll confess, despite my own significant skepticism after it bought and killed off Musical.ly in 2017/2018, that I hope the company survives and thrives. It would be good to see a meaningful competitor to the Facebook/Instagram and YouTube hegemony that can give creators and audiences more options, outlets, and experiences. But it’s going to be a crazy rest of 2020 and beyond before we know how this one turns out.

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Source: TubeFilter.com

Continue Reading Insights: Microsoft Intercepts TikTok Political Football, Despite Facebook’s Game Plan

Insights: Microsoft Intercepts TikTok Political Football, Despite Facebook’s Game Plan

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So, Microsoft wants to get into the business of social media. Real social media, not just the business of business-oriented social media. The tech giant’s executives must have been feeling left out of last week’s Congressional hearings featuring nearly six hours of posturing by pols and bland responses by CEOs from Apple, Alphabet, Amazon, and Facebook.

Of course, the day after their penalty-box appearances before Congress, those other four tech giants also reported huge quarterly earnings, with combined profits of around $29 billion for the quarter. If the Faustian price of that vast well of profits is an occasional day with the House Judiciary Committee, well, as Donald Trump put it regarding what was then 154,000 U.S. coronavirus deaths, “It is what it is.”

Still there are reasons why this makes sense for Microsoft. For instance, Morgan Stanley analyst Keith Weiss called the TikTok acquisition “a compelling fit” for Microsoft, because:

  • With 100 million U.S. users, TikTok would “immediately make Microsoft a viable player in the consumer-oriented social media space,” Weiss wrote in a research note. TikTok certainly is the hot newcomer giving The Zuckerbeast night sweats. After killing off failed TikTok clone Lasso at Facebook, subsidiary Instagram launched another copycat, Reels, this week in more than 50 countries. It’s counting on Reels and its Instagram integration to blunt TikTok’s surging popularity.
  • More surprisingly, to me anyway, Microsoft also could wring a lot more cash out of TikTok, Weiss wrote. Currently, the average revenue per user is paltry–less than $5. Microsoft, whose market capitalization sits north of $1.6 trillion, knows a little bit about extracting value from software.
  • Microsoft is best positioned to buy/rescue TikTok. There’s that $1.6 trillion valuation for one thing, and a cash hoard of $136 billion. Even if buying TikTok costs as much as $30 billion, per some reports, Microsoft could easily pay for it, and still have money to buy coffee for members of the entire House Judiciary Committee.
  • Just as important as wallet size is Microsoft’s acceptability to people on several sides of this conversation. Microsoft was the trillion-dollar tech company that wasn’t summoned before Congress. It doesn’t have issues with regulators over monopoly-power abuses (at least not in the last couple of decades). It even is likely the easiest company for Chinese regulators, investors, and nationalists to accept. Microsoft is highly esteemed in China, where it has had a presence for more than a quarter century. Over that time, it’s fostered a lot of goodwill, and sprinkled alumni throughout the country’s tech sector. Even ByteDance, TikTok’s parent company, was founded by a Microsoft alum, Zhang Yiming.

And there are other reasons that this acquisition will make sense once the dust settles from the purchase, regulatory approvals, and technical unwinding of the sold pieces from the rest of TikTok.

How Microsoft can integrate TikTok into Minecraft and more

To start with, given their hugely overlapping core demographics, integrating TikTok into Minecraft is a no-brainer. Minecraft has been one of the biggest sources of YouTube content for years now; transferring at least a portion of that video creation and audience directly to TikTok could be huge.

And what about Microsoft’s long-dominant PC operating system and related hardware? Could TikTok functionality be wired directly into Windows 10, and optimized in Surface laptops and tablets, perhaps with improved webcams or other consumer hardware?

Speaking of hardware integrations, Microsoft has spent a lot of money developing the HoloLens and related “mixed reality” immersive entertainment technologies. Could a marriage with TikTok ease the process of building short mixed-reality content for the next generation of creators on platforms beyond the PC and smartphone?

Closer to home, a big opportunity sits out there with Microsoft’s Xbox, which launches its next generation of consoles later this year, and Windows-based PCs. It’s also about to launch xCloud, a streaming game service on Android that’s designed to compete with Google‘s Stadia. Simplifying the output of gameplay videos from any of those platforms into TikTok could be a win-win, and a potentially compelling way to make up for Microsoft’s decision a month ago to kill Mixer, its Twitch competitor.

I’m less certain about how TikTok might integrate with LinkedIn, that business-facing social-media service Microsoft bought a few years back for $26 billion. The difference between buttoned-down posts about supply chains and marketing plans on the one hand, and dance routines and pratfall videos on the other, is huge.

But maybe it could work. LinkedIn has become a convenient successor for business cards, especially during the Zoom-addled pandemic and lockdown. The site is a vital resource for job seekers, employers, and recruiters. But LinkedIn hasn’t really innovated much since becoming part of Microsoft. The service has been smartly integrated with Outlook and other Microsoft services, but otherwise seems to have been largely left alone.

Maybe adding business-minded TikTok videos can become another way for people to showcase themselves and their talents on LinkedIn. It would still be a stretch, but I’m guessing the growing tribe of LinkedIn influencers out there hope they soon get a chance to figure it out.

TikTok was ready to take off. Then this happened.

TikTok has been positioned to take off this year. The company promised to spend up to $2 billion over the next three years to support creator monetization, half of that in the United States. It also promised to create 10,000 new U.S. jobs, and was looking for a new international headquarters, with New York and Los Angeles among possible locations. In his note, Weiss projected the company will generate $1 billion in revenue this year, and as much as $6 billion worldwide in 2021, half that from U.S. operations.

Basically, it’s turning into a formidable, deep-pocketed competitor for Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, and other, more established services with far more resources than the typical wannabe startup.

All that makes President Trump’s antipathy with the site–allegedly over “national security” but more likely over the role K-pop TikTok fans played in undermining his disastrous Tulsa political rally earlier in the summer–and Mark Zuckerberg‘s interests nicely aligned. Facebook can’t buy or bury TikTok, two of its time-tested tactics, and one cloning operation has already died. Reels, the new clone, seems fine, and well positioned for success as a new tab on Instagram. We’ll see whether users take advantage in large numbers.

Perhaps Zuckerberg’s newest playbook maneuver is to stir up enough political blowback to hamstring threatening burgeoning competition. He’s certainly not above that sort of strategy, given his long history of unscrupulous dealing with challengers. If nothing else, the distractions and sales talk guarantee TikTok executives will continue to be scattered for months.

As it is, lots of questions still need to be answered:

  • Why is Microsoft taking only the TikTok operations in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, but not England or Ireland?
  • What exactly will Microsoft be getting when it buys those parts of TikTok? Does it get to keep the secret-sauce algorithm that so effortlessly serves up the just the right next video? What will be the relationship with the remaining parts of TikTok in other countries, or with Douyin, ByteDance’s Chinese version of TikTok?
  • What will creators think of a bifurcated service? Do they lose access to their overseas audiences? Facebook is waving large checks in front of some TikTok stars already, and Snapchat is adding some TikTok-like functionality. Will TikSoft be able to retain most of its talent?
  • Is Microsoft really ready for the ramped-up scrutiny it will face over issues such as marketing to minors, culling hate speech and conspiracy theories, and quelling antitrust concerns?

TikTok was having one of the most remarkable years in the brief history of social media. I’ll confess, despite my own significant skepticism after it bought and killed off Musical.ly in 2017/2018, that I hope the company survives and thrives. It would be good to see a meaningful competitor to the Facebook/Instagram and YouTube hegemony that can give creators and audiences more options, outlets, and experiences. But it’s going to be a crazy rest of 2020 and beyond before we know how this one turns out.

Visit Tubefilter for more great stories.

Source: TubeFilter.com

Continue Reading Insights: Microsoft Intercepts TikTok Political Football, Despite Facebook’s Game Plan