Maybe the future of Apple TV is no Apple TV

The Apple TV device is at a crossroads. Here are some ideas to get it back on track (or end its development altogether).

Recently, I was in the market for a new television for my living room. After looking at countless online reviews and chatting with friends, I decided to purchase a new LG TV. This device isn’t my first smart TV, but the first I have purchased in nearly five years. Because of this, I’m having a lot of fun experiencing tools missing on my older Samsung, including Google Assistant integration and personalized entertainment.

At least for now, my LG television doesn’t support the third-party Apple TV app. However, that should change soon when an announced firmware update arrives. In the meantime, I’m going back and forth between the LG interface and my Apple TV 4K. However, I’m increasingly finding myself simply using the built-in entertainment apps on my television to watch Netflix, Hulu, and the like. Sure, not everything offered through the Apple TV is available here, such as certain streaming apps. For these times, however, I can use AirPlay 2. All this compatibility has made me question whether, in time, I even need an Apple TV device at all.

Ideas for the next Apple TV

Don’t get me wrong, I love my Apple TV and have three units in my home, each synced to my iCloud account. Historically, I’ve used Apple TV to access all of my streaming video content both through iTunes and third-party services like those mentioned above. More recently, I’ve dabbled in Apple Arcade on the device, although that’s more my daughter’s thing, and use it to watch Apple TV+ content.

Here’s the thing. Beyond this, I no longer see the need for an Apple TV and can’t imagine buying another one in its current form. Weather and social apps, for example, don’t do much for me on a bigger screen. The same goes for other apps such as those for photos and financial news.

Buy any smart television, like I just did, and you’ll quickly realize Apple TV’s fast-becoming a marginalized product, especially for non-gamers. Throw in Apple’s decision to finally offer third-party Apple TV apps for smart televisions, Roku, and Amazon Fire devices, and spending money on a physical Apple TV doesn’t make a lot of sense anymore.

As someone who has owned every Apple TV model ever made, I have always supported Cupertino’s “hobby” device. However, things need to change moving forward for the product to survive. Among my ideas to make this happen are as follows.

Time for an Apple TV Stick

If Apple wants to remain in the Apple TV hardware business, a Fire TV Stick-like product would no doubt be well received. Portable and low-cost, a tiny USB-connected device would be a great way to effortlessly carry Apple Arcade gaming to other televisions in your home or to family and friends.

Amazon charges $50 for its Fire Stick 4K. Even factoring in Apple’s propensity for premium pricing, the company could probably offer a USB-based Apple TV for around $99 and sell millions with lots of profit.

Lower the cost

If a Fire Stick-like product isn’t possible for whatever reason, Apple still needs to reconsider its Apple TV pricing strategy.

Anything above the $99 mark for an Apple TV device (stick or otherwise) no longer seems justified, especially with the availability now of the Apple TV app on similar devices.

The least expensive Apple TV 4K unit is $179, while the Apple TV HD is $149. Now compare this to the 4K Amazon Fire Cube, which is $120, and best-in-class Roku Ultra, which is $99, and you can see just how off these prices have become. And again, it’s worth reminding you that these devices support the Apple TV app!

An actual Apple TV

Nearly a decade ago, the Apple rumor mill mostly assumed an actual Apple television was incoming. That didn’t happen, of course. There’s little profit in making televisions, especially on the lower end of the pricing scale. However, that hasn’t kept companies like LG and Samsung from offering newer (and larger) models each year.

I’m not entirely sold on a physical Apple Television, although I can see a scenario where one could be justified. For one, any Apple Television would need to match or exceed the internals on the current crop of 8K televisions. Second, the television’s tvOS would have to have bells and whistles missing from regular tvOS. This one-two combination would almost certainly be enough to launch a first-generation model, assuming Apple backs it up with its many resources, financial and otherwise.

My initial thought was that an Apple Television should be premium-priced. However, perhaps this isn’t the way to go, at least at first. With 8K still in its infancy, possibly offering an aggressively priced 8K television is a better choice. Coupled with the launch of an 8K-supported iPhone camera, and suddenly this makes more sense.

Or they could kill the Apple TV in its current form

One final option would be to discontinue Apple TV hardware and continue to expand the Apple TV app’s reach to other non-Apple products. Deciding on this solution, however, would do nothing to maintain Apple Arcade and tvOS games. Perhaps along with ending Apple TV development, the company could introduce a USB-based gaming-only device. Another solution: pivot the current Apple TV design to a gaming-only device and make it a PlayStation and Xbox competitor.

Thoughts?

Hopefully, we’ll hear more about Apple’s plans for Apple TV in the coming months. Until then, we can put together wish lists! Where do you hope to see Apple TV go in the future? Let us know your thoughts below.

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Little America — Inside the Episode: “The Son” | Apple TV+

Take a look inside “The Son” with the creative team behind the episode. Watch Little America now on the Apple TV app with an Apple TV+ subscription: http://apple.co/_LittleAmerica

Inspired by the true stories featured in Epic Magazine, “Little America” goes beyond the headlines to bring to life the funny, romantic, heartfelt and surprising stories of immigrants in America. The first season consists of eight half-hour episodes, each with its own unique story from different parts of the world.

“Little America,” is written and executive produced by Lee Eisenberg (“The Office,” Good Boys), who serves as showrunner, and executive produced by Kumail Nanjiani (The Big Sick, “Silicon Valley”), Emily V. Gordon (The Big Sick), Alan Yang (“Master of None,” “Parks and Recreation”), Sian Heder (Tallulah, “Orange Is the New Black”), Joshuah Bearman (Argo), Joshua Davis (Spare Parts) and Arthur Spector (The Shack). Heder also serves as co-showrunner alongside Eisenberg.

Subscribe to Apple TV’s YouTube channel: https://apple.co/AppleTVYouTube

Follow Little America:
Instagram: https://instagram.com/OurLittleAmerica

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More from Apple TV: https://apple.co/32qgOEJ

Stories to believe in. Apple TV+ is a streaming service with original stories from the most creative minds in TV and film. Watch now on the Apple TV app: https://apple.co/_AppleTVapp

#LittleAmerica #America #AppleTV

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Amazing Stories — Official Trailer | Apple TV+

Five tales. Infinite imagination. Watch Amazing Stories on March 6 on the Apple TV app with an Apple TV+ subscription: https://apple.co/_AmazingStories

From visionary executive producers Steven Spielberg and Edward Kitsis & Adam Horowitz, this reimagining of the classic anthology series transports everyday characters into worlds of wonder, possibility, and imagination.

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Stories to believe in. Apple TV+ is a streaming service with original stories from the most creative minds in TV and film. Watch now on the Apple TV app: https://apple.co/_AppleTVapp

#AmazingStories #Trailer #AppleTV

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Apple Posts Trailer for Upcoming Apple TV+ Science Fiction Series, ‘Amazing Stories’

Apple on Monday shared a trailer for its upcoming Apple TV+ series, “Amazing Stories.” The series is a reboot of the original 1980s TV series of the same name.

The series, one of the first Apple picked up for its fledgling streaming service, is an anthology, with each episode focusing on a new topic and featuring a new cast, much like “Twilight Zone” and “Black Mirror.”

The series was created by industry bigwig Steven Spielberg, who also serves as executive producer this time around.



Apple says that each episode of the series will “transport the audience to worlds of wonder through the lens of today’s most imaginative filmmakers, directors, and writers.”

Stars in upcoming “Amazing Stories” episodes include Dylan O’Brien (“Maze Runner,” “Teen Wolf”), Victoria Pedretti (“You”), Josh Holloway (“Lost,” “Yellowstone”), Sasha Alexander (“Rizzoli & Isles,” “Shameless”) and the late Robert Forster (“Twin Peaks”) in one of his final roles.

“Amazing Stories” will debut on Friday, March 6, 10 episodes will make up the first season of the show.

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Source: mactrast.com

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Original Content podcast: ‘Mythic Quest’ is a likable comedy with a single standout episode

There’s plenty to like about “Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet,” a new series on Apple TV+ — its sympathetic-but-critical portrayal of the video game industry, its goofy-but-likable characters and a couple of big surprises that come at the end of the season.

But what really stood out to us — as we discuss on the latest episode of the Original Content podcast — was a single episode, “A Dark Quiet Death.”

Without getting into spoilers, it’s probably safe to reveal that the episode mostly stands apart from the rest of the season, telling a self-contained story about two characters (played by Jake Johnson and Cristin Milioti) who, after they create a quirky horror video game that turns into a surprise hit, discover that success isn’t all its cracked up to be.

Where the rest of “Mythic Quest” is a broad comedy (with the aforementioned likable characters and surprising plot), “A Dark Quiet Death” is more of a drama that quietly — but agonizingly — portrays the tensions between commerce and art. And if we have a criticism, it’s that the episode’s achievement can make the rest of the show feel a little silly in comparison.

We also discuss Anthony’s interview with the creators of the show and how “Mythic Quest” might have been shaped by the involvement of video game company Ubisoft. And before we begin the review, we react to this year’s Oscars.

You can listen in the player below, subscribe using Apple Podcasts or find us in your podcast player of choice. If you like the show, please let us know by leaving a review on Apple. You can also send us feedback directly. (Or suggest shows and movies for us to review!)

And if you’d like to skip ahead, here’s how the episode breaks down:

0:00 Intro
0:27 Oscars discussion
17:54 “Mythic Quest” review
50:31 “Mythic Quest” spoiler discussion

Source: techcrunch.com

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Little America — Inside the Episode: “The Silence” | Apple TV+

Take a look inside “The Silence” with the creative team behind the episode. Watch Little America now on the Apple TV app with an Apple TV+ subscription: http://apple.co/_LittleAmerica

Inspired by the true stories featured in Epic Magazine, “Little America” goes beyond the headlines to bring to life the funny, romantic, heartfelt and surprising stories of immigrants in America. The first season consists of eight half-hour episodes, each with its own unique story from different parts of the world.

“Little America,” is written and executive produced by Lee Eisenberg (“The Office,” Good Boys), who serves as showrunner, and executive produced by Kumail Nanjiani (The Big Sick, “Silicon Valley”), Emily V. Gordon (The Big Sick), Alan Yang (“Master of None,” “Parks and Recreation”), Sian Heder (Tallulah, “Orange Is the New Black”), Joshuah Bearman (Argo), Joshua Davis (Spare Parts) and Arthur Spector (The Shack). Heder also serves as co-showrunner alongside Eisenberg.

Subscribe to Apple TV’s YouTube channel: https://apple.co/AppleTVYouTube

Follow Little America:
Instagram: https://instagram.com/OurLittleAmerica

Follow Apple TV:
Instagram: https://instagram.com/AppleTV
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AppleTV
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AppleTV
Giphy: https://giphy.com/AppleTV

More from Apple TV: https://apple.co/32qgOEJ

Stories to believe in. Apple TV+ is a streaming service with original stories from the most creative minds in TV and film. Watch now on the Apple TV app: https://apple.co/_AppleTVapp

#LittleAmerica #America #AppleTV

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Best romantic movies to watch for Valentine's Day

These 8 amazing romantic movies are perfect to watch with your Valentine.

Romantic movies often get a bad wrap. They can often be cheesy or over-the-top, but I think that’s what makes them awesome and there’s no better day to watch romantic movies than on Valentine’s Day. So grab your Valentine and some popcorn and stream on of these great romance movies. You might cry, you might laugh, but you’ll be experiencing all the emotions together, and isn’t that what Valentine’s Day is all about?

The Notebook

Starring Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams, The Notebook is a very touching story of a couple whose relationship gets put on hold when World War II starts. The torrid love story is known to be a tear-jerker so it might be a good idea to keep the tissues on hand.

Streaming on Netflix

Pride and Prejudice

This classic novel adaptation that came out in 2005 stars Keira Knightley as Elizabeth and Matthew Macfadyen as Darcy. The headstrong and independent Elizabeth is getting pressured into marriage, and it isn’t until she meets Darcy that she starts to warm up to the idea. Problem is, Darcy is a bit of a stick in the mud! This period piece also landed an Oscar nomination for Keira Knightley.

Streaming on Hulu

10 Things I Hate About You

Party like it’s 1999 with this classic romantic comedy starring the late Heath Ledger alongside Julia Stiles and a very young Joseph Gordon-Levitt. It’s a classic high school tale of romance filled with laughs and plently of romance to go around. It’s a loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, so you know there’s going to be plenty of love hijinx!

Streaming on Disney+

The Big Sick

One of my personal favorites, The Big Sick is based on the true story of how Kumail Nanjiani met and fell in love with his wife Emily. It’s super touching, has amazingly funny moments, and definitely has the potential to make you cry the happiest of tears

Streaming on Amazon Prime

Up in the Air

Okay, full confession, this movie isn’t the most romantic and it’s more about self-love than romantic love, but it’s too good to leave off this list. George Clooney stars as Ryan, a frequent flyer who travels the country firing people from their jobs. He’s cool, calm, unattached, and likes his life. But when his boss tells him to show his new coworkers, Natalie (played by Anna Kendrick), the ropes, he slowly starts to realize his life isn’t as good as it seems. It was nominated for six Oscars!

Streaming on Netflix

A Star Is Born

A remake of the classic tale, A Star is Born stars an all-star cast including Bradley Cooper, Lady Gaga, and Dave Chapelle. It’s a pretty tragic story that is likely going to make you cry, but all the best whirlwind romances do — don’t they?

Streaming on Hulu

P.S. I Love You

It’s hard to move on when the person you love passes away, but as P.S. I Love You shows, it’s worth it in the end. Hilary Swank stars in the lead role as she keeps getting letters from her dead husband (Gerard Butler) that send her on new adventures. The letters are attempting to guide her into the future, but her family worries they are keeping her tied to the past.

Streaming on Netflix

Zack and Miri Make a Porno

As the title suggests, this love story is raunchy and very adult, but a ton of fun and will have you laughing out loud. Zack (Seth Rogen) and Miri (Elizabeth Banks) are roommates and best friends who can’t afford their bills. They get a brilliant idea to film a porno in order to make ends meets — one problem they don’t have money to hire enough talent. If you like raunchy fun, and can handle some slapstick humor, Zack and Miri Make a Porno is very entertaining.

Streaming on Netflix

What are your favorites?

These are some of our favorite romantic movies to enjoy over Valentine’s Day. What are your favorites? Did we miss any? Let us know in the comments!

Source: imore.com

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8 best Valentine's Day episodes of your favorite TV shows

Can you feel the love? Check out these eight great episodes on TV all about Valentine’s Day!

Valentine’s Day is drawing near, and whether you have any special plans or not, curling up on the couch and watching some classic episodes of TV is always a good time. Whether you want to laugh, cry, or both, here are 8 episodes of TV you can stream on your iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV this Valentine’s Day to get your love fix!

Communication Studies — Community Season 1, Episode 16

If you’ve ever watched community you know that Greendale (the fictional college where the show takes place), was always a fan of pointless school dances. In Communication Studies the school’s Valentine’s Day dance is mostly a backdrop for the show’s plot to take place, but it’s full of some real heartfelt moments that and hilarious hijinx that make it worth a watch. Plus, you get to see some killer dance moves from Jeff and Abed. Streaming on Hulu

I Love Lisa — The Simpsons Season 4, Episode 15

Do you remember getting Valentine’s Day cards from your classmates in school? It was always a stressful day, and for Ralph Wiggum, it was a sad day as no one in his class gave him one. Lisa, feeling sorry for Ralph, makes him a card. Ralph takes this gesture to mean a little more than it is, setting into motion a series of events that lead to some pretty serious drama. This episode is very touching and I think everyone in the show learns some important lessons. Streaming on Disney+

Galentine’s Day — Parks and Recreation Season 2, Episode 16

I truly believe there’s a little Leslie Knope in all of us and Galentine’s Day is a sweet (and funny) tradition that I’m still hoping catches on. On February 13th. Leslie gathers all her closest gal-pals to enjoy time together without the men in their lives to enjoy breakfast, exchange gifts, and hear her mother tell the story of how she met a sexy lifeguard with whom she had a brief relationship. Of course, getting into the romantic spirit Leslie goes on a journey to reunite the pair, only for things to go horribly wrong. While this isn’t your typical Valentine’s Day episode, it really celebrates friendship in a very sweet way, and by the end of the episode, I guarantee you will be smiling. Streaming on Netflix

Frist Girlfriend’s Club — Boy Meets World Season 5, Episode 15

I couldn’t find a video clip from this episode, but it’s a classic from Boy Meets World. In the later seasons of the show, you may remember that Shawn and Angela get together, but their relationship is almost derailed by a bunch of Shawn’s ex-girlfriends when they kidnap him to prevent him from making his date with Angela. Of course, this episode is right in the middle of the Cory, Topanga, and Lauren love triangle “crisis” adding to the drama of the episode.

The episode is a pivotal moment in both Shawn’s development as a character and the relationship of Cory and Topanga, there’s no way my list would be complete without mentioning it. Streaming on Disney+

Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered — Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 2, Episode 16

Buffy the Vampire Slayer is my favorite show of all time and Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered is a classic episode that many fans of the show adore. Cordelia breaks up with Xander because her social status at school is taking a nosedive. Xander upset manages to blackmail Amy (a witch) to cast a love spell on Cordelia so they can be together. Much to Xander’s dismay, the love spell doesn’t seem to affect Cordelia; however, every other girl seems to want to be with him. The whole episode devolves into every girl in town becoming a Xander-loving zombie, which is equally terrifying and funny at the same time. Any episode that heavily features the loveable and dorky Xander is worth watching. IN fact, when you’re done watching this episode, just watch the entire series, it’s a real treat! Streaming on Hulu

The One with Unagi — Friends Season 6, Episode 17

Friends had a few Valentine’s Day focused episodes, and while The One with Unagi is the least Valentine’s Day centric, it’s my personal favorite. Chandler is freaking out because he and Monica were supposed to give each other handmade gifts and he forgot, on his quest to find something last minute he throws out a lot of classic Chandler one-liners. Joey gets the brilliant idea to hire a fake twin to land a role that leads to all sorts of hijinx. Of course, Ross attempts to convince Pheobe and Rachel that they need “Unagi” — which he claim is a stand of mind to be prepared for the unexpected — to protect themselves from attackers by jumping out an scaring them on a couple of occasions. Unagi is actually a word for eel and has nothing to do with mental preparedness, but if you watch the episode you’ll see just how this turns out for Ross. Streaming on Netflix

Valentine’s Day — The Office Season 2, Episode 16

If you haven’t binge-watched The Office at least three times already, I’m not really sure what you’re doing with your life, but if you want to revisit Scranton once again, Valentine’s Day is a great episode. The episode features small romantic storylines from all the casts couples — Pam and Roy, Angela and Dwight, and Phyllis and Bob. Meanwhile, at a corporate meeting. the cringe-worthy Michael Scott not only reveals to his coworkers, that he slept with his boss — Jan — but also shows a video he “edited on his Mac”. Next year The Office is slated to leave Netflix, so make sure you watch this episode (and the entire series) before its too late! Streaming on Netflix

Valentine’s Day Massacre — Grey’s Anatomy Season 6, Episode 14

If you’re feeling more dramatic than comedic this Valentine’s Day (hey, I’m not judging), then check out Valentine’s Day Massacre from Grey’s Anatomy. When the roof at a romantic restaurant falls down on Valentine’s Day, dozens of patients get rushed to the hospital forces Meredith and all the other doctors to get to work. Of course, as the drama intensifies so does all the drama and relationships between the cast members. If you need a good cry, this may be the episode for you. Streaming on Netflix

What are your favorite Valentine’s Day episodes?

There are a lot of TV shows out there and plenty have Valentine’s Day episodes. Tell us your favorites in the comments down below.

Source: imore.com

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The team behind Apple’s ‘Mythic Quest’ says video games aren’t the punch line

When Ubisoft first approached “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” stars Rob McElhenney and Charlie Day about creating a new show set in the video game industry, McElhenney said they weren’t interested — at least not initially.

“Anything that we had ever seen in the past, from a movie or television show perspective, the industry was always presented in such a negative light,” he told me. “It was the butt of the joke. The characters themselves were derided, and it was very specific to geek culture…. We just had no interest in that.”

And yet McElhenney, Day and “It’s Always Sunny” writer Megan Ganz ended up creating “Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet,” which premieres on Apple TV+ this weekend. McElhenney explained that a visit to the Montreal offices of Ubisoft — publisher of “Assassin’s Creed,” “Prince of Persia” and other major game franchises — changed his mind.

“Once we went to Montreal and met all of the devs that worked at Ubisoft, that all work in communion to make these games, [we realized] how many different, disparate personalities there really were and how much they were all united by their love of games,” he said.

So McElhenney decided that “this just seemed like a really interesting and new place to set those kinds of stories.” And just as he assumes most “Sunny” viewers aren’t tuning in to learn the fate of Paddy’s Pub (the Philadelphia bar run by the show’s main characters), “The approach we took was, the general audience is not going to care about the success or failure of a video game; they’re going to care about the interpersonal dynamics of the characters themselves.”

Ganz also said she didn’t know much about video game development when McElhenney first approached her about collaborating on the show, but she started to see parallels between that world and a TV writers’ room.

“Except that instead of everyone being a writer, they all have very specialized jobs that they care about, like just the writing or just the design or just the money that’s being made,” she said. “And I thought, well, that’s really fun because that presents something that’s even more complex than your typical writers’ room — you have all these sort of Greek gods that all control their very specific part of the world.”

Mythic Quest

Of course, “Mythic Quest” had a writers’ room of its own, which Ganz said was divided evenly between people with deep knowledge of the industry (like Ashly Burch, who’s done extensive voiceover work on games like “Team Fortress 2” and “Fortnite,” and who also plays a game tester on the show), and those like Ganz who casually played games but ultimately didn’t know much about that world.

“We did that because ultimately, if you come up with a script or a joke that satisfies both of those people, then you’re going to satisfy as much of the audience as you possibly can,” she said.

The goal, she added, was not “pandering to the video game community” but rather “to be authentic and not make fun of them, but also be authentic in terms of talking about some of the toxicity that happens in the video game space, the gender dynamics that are at play.”

It wasn’t just a learning process for the writers. F. Murray Abraham (who won an Oscar for playing Salieri in “Amadeus”) plays an eccentric science fiction writer who works on the game, and he told me that when it came to video games, “I had no idea. I knew something, I was aware of it, but not the size of it, the success of it, the reach of it, my God.”

All the “Mythic Quest” writers and actors I spoke to said that their approach has evolved significantly from the original pilot script. For example, there’s McElhenney’s character Ian Grimm, the creative director of the massively multiplayer online roleplaying game that gives the show its name.

“In the first draft of the script, we made Ian a little bit more of just a straight buffoon,” McElhenney said. “We read through it and we realized it just felt false. It was missing something, that if we didn’t want this to feel like a live action cartoon — like ‘Sunny’ often does, which is by design — and we wanted these people to feel real and authentic, that we needed to believe that he really should have that position.”

The question, then, was how to make him competent in a funny way. They went with a pilot episode where Ian and lead engineer Poppy (played by Charlotte Nicdao) end up in a passionate debate about the properties of the game’s brand new shovel. While that debate will probably seem silly to most viewers, McElhenney said it also conveys “that thing that so many people in the creative arts have, or don’t have — the ability to see the most minor detail; the reason why something is going to work or why it might not work.”

Mythic Quest

Throughout that process, the writers also tapped Ubisoft for advice. Jason Altman, Ubisoft’s head of film and television, is an executive producer on the show. He recalled bringing in different team members to help the writers understand everything that goes into the development process.

In addition, Ubisoft Red Storm (the studio behind the Tom Clancy game franchise) pitched in by building the game segments that we actually see on the show.

“What they created were actually small gameplay sandboxes that we could bring to set, and the actors could sit and play with them and it would actually inform their performances,” Altman said.

He acknowledged that there were challenges, like helping the “Mythic Quest” writers realize that the developers needed time to do their work. But ultimately, he said, the Red Storm team had “a great time” creating something that gave the show “a real sense of authenticity.”

Ganz and McElhenney also had plenty of praise for the developers, particularly for their openness to adding silly comedic elements like ridiculous gouts of blood. McElhenney pointed to one episode that required them to create “a really believable Sieg Heil Nazi salute.”

“There’s no way they’re going to go for that; it’s going to take a follow-up phone call,” he recalled thinking. “And they were like, ‘Okay great.’ And I was like, ‘Wait, what do you mean, okay great?’ They said, ‘No, we do Nazis all the time’ — and we put this in the show — ‘because Nazis make the best villains, everybody hates Nazis.’”

I was also curious about why the show focuses on the development of an ongoing MMORPG, rather than launching a new game. Altman had an answer for me: “I think it represents what’s happening within the game industry. You don’t just launch a game and forget it. The development team lives with it, you’ve got live services and live events. It’s the way games are operated right now.”

Plus, he said it reflects another aspect of development;the fact that teams “don’t just spend six months together, they spend years together, and the success that they create together binds them together.”

David Hornsby — who, like McElhenney, is both a writer, executive producer and actor on the show — told me that the writers’ understanding of show’s distribution plan also evolved since Apple TV+ hadn’t launched (or even been officially announced) when “Mythic Quest” first got picked up.

“We weren’t sure if it wasn’t going to be binge-able from the start, we heard incrementally,” Hornsby said. “Apple is good at keeping secrets.”

Ultimately, they did find out that all nine episodes of the first season would drop at once, which Hornsby said led them to structure the season “like a movie — we know where we are going to be in the middle of the season, the story arcs for each of our characters.”

I also brought up Apple TV+ with McElhenney, who said the team had offers from a number of studios.

“It was scary,” he said. “And I remember we were discussing it, we were like, do we go with a known quantity? Or do we jump into the waters of mystery, because even though it’s the biggest company in the world, you don’t know if it’s going to work.”

So why choose Apple? “We just felt like, if you’re gonna bet on somebody, why not bet on a trillion dollars? They seem to have the resources and something figured out.”

Source: techcrunch.com

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How to watch The Oscars 2020 on iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV

Once a year all of Hollywood stops and takes a night to give out awards to films, directors, actors, and crew for making some fantastic entertainment. There’s always a lot of glitz and glam, and this year it’s a little earlier than normal! The Oscars 2020 — officially the 92nd Academy Awards — is happening on Sunday, Feb. 9, 2020, starting at 8 p.m. Eastern. The Awards Ceremony will take place at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, and be broadcast live on ABC.

Unfortunately, if you want to watch The Oscars on your iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV you don’t have a ton of options, but there are a few ways to get the awards on our devices!

The ABC app

The ABC app will carry the live stream of The Oscars, but you will need to have a supported login from a live TV streaming service or cable company. The ABC app supports logins from Hulu, YouTube TV and AT&T TV Now, so those should be a safe bet.

It’s important to know that The Oscars live stream in the ABC app varies by TV market location. There is a full list of supported markets on Oscar.go.com, so it may be a good idea to click through and make sure you’re in the clear.

ABC — Live TV

Watch The Oscars on the ABC — Live TV app as long as you have a subscription to the channel through cable or another service. You can get the app on iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV.

Free Download

Hulu with Live TV

You can get a one week free trial of Hulu with Live TV, but after that, it will cost you $55 a month. On top of getting Hulu as a streaming service, Hulu with Live TV has a ton of local stations and is available on iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV.

Hulu with Live TV

Hulu combines a huge back catalog of shows with a large selection of live TV channels. This includes many local ABC stations, which makes it your ticket to The Oscars 2020.

$55 after free trial

YouTube TV

YouTube TV comes with a two-week free trial, but after your month is up it will charge you $50 monthly to continue the service. YouTube TV is a pretty simple way to stream TV and has a ton of channels. Plus, it’s available for iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV, meaning you can watch The Oscars how you want.

YouTube TV

YouTube TV has a simple solution to streaming TV, with a single plan and tons of channels — including ABC for watching The Oscars in 2020.

$50 after free trial

AT&T TV Now — Plus Plan

AT&T TV Now has one of the largest selections of channels, so you can watch The Oscars on your iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV with ease. There is a limited free trial, but typically the service costs $65 a month.

AT&T TV Now

AT&T TV Now has one of the deepest channel lineups available. Get The Oscars 2020 streaming on the Plus Plan, then spend the week watching award-winning movies with HBO included.

$65 after free trial

A VPN service

Streaming things outside of the U.S. can get tricky, and if you happen to be away for the big night, a VPN may be able to help you out. A VPN —which is short for “Virtual Private Network” — ends your internet traffic from far away through a specific set of servers, then pops it back into the United States. It can also give you security and peace of mind on open WiFi connections, because a VPN protects you against snoopers on any network.

If you’re looking for a great VPN, we recommend ExpressVPN. It’s fast, has a tons of servers, and great customer service!

ExpressVPN

ExpressVPN has everything expected you need for a quality VPN experience, including several plans at different prices. Plus, it has apps for all major platforms and servers in 94 different countries.

$12.95 a month

Want to know more about watching the Oscars on other devices? Check out CordCutters’ in-depth guide!

How to watch the Oscars without cable

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Source: imore.com

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