Insights: HBO Max May Change A Lot, And Complicate A Lot More

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HBO Max launched this week to positive reviews, and substantial confusion: How is it different from HBO? Do I still need HBO Go, or HBO Now, or HBO HBO? And why isn’t it on Amazon or Roku?

If somehow, all that left you a bit puzzled, you weren’t alone.

Yes, it’s clear that AT&T unit WarnerMedia has a potential blockbuster, possibly a must-have for streaming-video consumers. And that’s before Hulu founder Jason Kilar, recently named WarnerMedia’s new head, settles in and hones the still-imperfect product to a fine edge.

That alone could realign the streaming wars. For instance, HBO Max’s debut is likely what encouraged Apple to dump its originals-only strategy for TV+ and, reportedly, buy library content from other companies.

As it is, HBO Max is one of the most ambitious (and expensive, at $15 a month) services out there, a so-called “four-quadrant” offering. It has something for just about everyone, from beloved TV series such as Friends and The Big Bang Theory to film classics from the Turner and Warner vaults, documentaries, and of course the exquisite HBO array of shows, including The Sopranos, Game of Thrones, and current programs. There is even some original content, though the pandemic delayed much of it.

That breadth of programming dwarfs two other big new services: TV+, with about 30 shows and features, and Disney+, which has lots of shows for young children, Disney geeks, and fans of Marvel and Star Wars, but little for the rest of us.

Max’s basic pitch–“It’s HBO, plus a bunch of other cool stuff you’ll probably like, for the same price, all of it streaming on demand”–will likely resonate widely.

Why HBO Max is different

But HBO Max also is also realigning the business in other ways, most particularly because of why it’s not part of Roku and Amazon.

“This is the new carriage battle of 2020,” analyst Rich Greenfield of LightShed Partners said in a webinar this week.

By that, he means it’s a lot like what happened over the past few decades, when pay-TV providers fought with popular channels such as ESPN or CBS or Fox News over fee hikes to carry the channel on their cable service. Usually, eventually, the cable company caved. Maybe we’ll see the same thing happen with Roku and Amazon. But in the meantime, we’re seeing the streaming business shift, and a market opportunity emerge amid the growing customer confusion.

The Roku-Amazon-HBO Max fight is ultimately over having your expensive collection of programming and your fancy app experience and your incredibly valuable direct relationship with consumers chopped up and disaggregated onto someone else’s platform. Worse, those platforms have their own competing programming services.

Amazon’s Channels has generated a reported $2.5 billion a year from 5 million Prime Video customers. As Greenfield said, “It’s a very good business for Amazon to be in.”

But WarnerMedia doesn’t want to give up that control over what will be its most important new product in decades.

After all, Greenfield said, “Why bother building an HBO Max app if you’re going to just let everyone take your content onto their app?”

AT&T incoming CEO John Stankey, whom Kilar succeeded at WarnerMedia, recently told CNBC, “Roku and Amazon have elected not to be distributors. I step back and think we must be doing something right if someone believes we’re starting to be in conflict with their business.”

Apple does feature HBO Max on its platform, but that’s because Apple basically operates as a program directory for the service. Click on one of HBO’s shows, and off you go to the separate HBO Max app.

But that leaves Roku and Amazon on the outside, refusing to carry HBO Max under the terms AT&T demands, even as the older HBO Now app (which streams just the HBO library of shows) remains available. Together, those two providers reach around 80 million U.S. homes.

Into the HBO Max customer labyrinth

As Variety chief TV critic Caroline Framke put it in an otherwise positive review, finding HBO Max has become “a surprisingly labyrinthine situation that I can’t imagine will help it in the long run.”

It’s a recipe for consumer confusion, especially compared to the expensive and annoying traditional pay-TV bundle, which at least provided clarity and simplicity: You got a batch of channels from one provider, who even hooked you up with add-ons like HBO.

HBO Max’s standoff with Amazon and Roku likely means it’ll be more difficult to have that kind of simplicity going forward.

There are companies trying to solve these complications before they get any worse. Recently, I talked with one startup focused on the issue: Paket.TV, which was founded by Raffi Bagdasarian, a veteran of Disney, Universal Music, and Sony Pictures Television.

Paket’s website promises, “One monthly bill. One login for all your favorite services. Bundle discounts.”

Consumers benefit from a clearer, simpler, more straightforward approach. “We’re offering a unified authentication, billing, and discovery platform for consumers to basically have a portable plan that they can take anywhere,” Bagdasarian told me.

Building “Switzerland” for streaming services

But such an offering won’t work unless the streaming providers also benefit.

For the hundreds of niche providers out there (think CrunchyRoll, Africa Channel, Revry, Dove Channel, among so many), the benefits should be pretty clear. Anything that improves the chance their service will be found, and then reduces the friction of signing up and keeping those consumers, is a win.

A “Switzerland” approach such as Paket’s might be the only way to successfully recreate pay-TV’s useful clarity and simplicity, especially as the big streamers get more competitive with each other. Paket won’t arrive for several months, but it, or something like it, might be our last chance to have a simpler experience in our very complicated streaming future.

“If you’re a streaming service provider, you’re going to see so many new services launching with a lot of marketing, and they’re going to all have some kind of incentive to get you locked into their ecosystem,” Bagdasarian says. “The founding ethos of Paket is, ‘Why not create a platform that is fully independent, has all the benefits, but that isn’t taking the revenue from streaming providers that are competing with them?’”

It’s a pretty interesting question. Now to see if the industry, and its consumers, want an answer.

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Trump’s Executive Order Targeting Social Platforms Could Hurt “Internet Freedom,” Google Says

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Donald Trump’s newly signed executive order seeks to strip social media platforms of protections which keep them from being sued over content posted by users.

If that happens, YouTube’s parent company Google tells Tubefilter, it “would hurt America’s economy and its global leadership on internet freedom.”

YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram are all explicitly named in Trump’s order, which takes aim at Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act. This federal statute says that providers of “interactive computer services” where users can post their thoughts are not considered to be the publishers of those thoughts. That’s a critical distinction, because if platforms aren’t publishers, they’re not necessarily expected to vet or approve content users generate. They’re just providing a place to post it–which means if it’s libelous or lawbreaking, they aren’t legally liable.

Section 230 also mandates that providers are allowed to remove users’ content in “good faith,” and can’t be sued for it. Basically, platforms are allowed to set content policies, and are allowed to enforce those policies by restricting or removing content that is “obscene, lewd, lascivious, filthy, excessively violent, harassing or otherwise objectionable, whether or not such material is constitutionally protected.”

The latter provision is what made it perfectly legal for Twitter, this week, to add fact-check information to Trump’s misleading tweets about mail-in ballots and voter fraud. It was also legal for Twitter, yesterday, to limit the visibility of tweets where Trump appeared to threaten to use deadly military force on people in Minnesota protesting the alleged murder of George Floyd, a black man, at the hands of police officers.

Twitter’s actions are what spurred Trump to create and sign the executive order. Via the order, he argues that by restricting and/or removing users’ policy-violating content, platforms are acting as publishers, and therefore should not be protected from legal action. He claims platforms are infringing on users’ freedom of speech, and are “engaging in selective censorship” that “clearly reflects political bias.”

The order aims to strip platforms of safe harbor

Ultimately, the order instructs the Federal Communications Commission–which, according to experts who spoke to The New York Times, doesn’t have jurisdiction over this issue–to develop new regulations that could strip social platforms of Section 230 protections if they are deemed to have removed users’ content in bad faith. Losing protections would leave platforms open to both lawsuits over lawbreaking content, and lawsuits from users whose content is removed.

The order is a long way from actually resulting in concrete, enforceable policy changes, but Google and YouTube are watching it closely. YouTube has been a frequent target of complaints that it unfairly demonetizes/deplatforms conservative users and their content, but there’s no evidence of that–and investigations into far-right and alt-right “rabbit holes” have indicated that ultraconservative content has a foothold on the site.

“We have clear content policies and we enforce them without regard to political viewpoint,” Google tells Tubefilter. “Our platforms have empowered a wide range of people and organizations from across the political spectrum, giving them a voice and new ways to reach their audiences.”

Separately, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki told Bloomberg, “We have worked extraordinarily hard to make sure that all of our policies and systems are built in a fair and neutral and consistent way.”

Apparently presented with the idea that if policies are changed, Google could split YouTube into a separate company to contain legal risk, she said she doesn’t think that’s likely. “We work pretty closely with Google and there’s a lot of benefits that we get as being part of Google,” she said.

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CAA Signs TikTok Creator And Budding Fashion Influencer Cosette Rinab

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CAA has added another budding TikTok star to its talent coffers.

The agency has signed Cosette Rinab for representation in all areas. Rinab, 20, joined the app in early 2019 and has since amassed 2.1 million followers.

Rinab is beloved for her eye-catching work with TikTok’s editing features. Throughout her career, she has also worked as a consultant and sponsored content partner alongside top fashion brands like Dolce & Gabbana, Levi’s, Tory Burch, and Boohoo. She was also one of three TikTok stars personally tapped by the platform — alongside Taylor Hage (917,000 followers) and Tyler Gaca (625,000) — to attend New York Fashion Week and broadcast videos from the shows for her legions of fans.

Rinab was born in New York City but currently resides in Los Angeles, where she is studying public relations at the University Of Southern California. She also boasts a burgeoning presence on both Instagram and YouTube.

Other TikTok stars signed to CAA include actress and vegan food blogger Tabitha Brown (3.2 million followers), the app’s formerly-most-followed-star Loren Gray (44 million), music and comedy creator Sam Hurley (3.7 million), and actor Case Walker (2.1 million).

Photo credit: Tyler Butler

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Video Messaging Startup ‘Loom’ Closes $29 Million Funding Round At $350 Million Valuation

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Loom, a digital video startup seeking to fill a niche in the remote work industry by enabling users to concurrently record their screens and their faces — with audio — and instantly share ensuing clips via email or text message, has just closed a $28.75 million funding round.

The Series B round, led by Sequoia Capital and Coatue, brings Loom’s total funds raised to $73 million, and values the company at $350 million, reports Forbes — which is two times Loom’s valuation since its last funding round only seven months ago. In addition to previous investors like Kleiner Perkins and Slack, Loom also counts prominent Silicon Valley figures as backers, including Ashton Kutcher and Instagram founder Kevin Systrom.

Loom’s use cases are perfectly a propos for the seismic shift toward telecommuting that the corporate world has seen in recent months — including at tech giants like Twitter and Facebook — in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The platform enables users to provide project feedback or walk colleagues through a proposal, for instance. And outside of business, the app is also being used by teachers, per Forbes, who can create lessons for students to consume at their own convenience.

Accordingly, Loom — not to be confused with Zoom, another video conferencing app that has seen usership skyrocket amid the pandemic — has garnered swaths of new users in recent months. From the date that the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that COVID-19 was a ‘Public Health Emergency of International Concern‘ on Jan. 30, according to Forbes, Loom has seen total users double to 4 million — across a total of 90,000 companies.

In response to this unprecedented demand and current events, Forbes reports that Loom temporarily dropped the price for its premium service, Loom Pro (which is now priced at $5 per month, and which offers more advanced recording and editing tools than its free basic recording product). Loom has also bestowed permanent free access to Loom Pro to verified teachers and students.

Loom, which first hit the market in June 2016 as a free Google Chrome extension — was co-founded by 30-year-old Joe Thomas, who dropped out of college to begin a career in coding and launch his journey as an entrepreneur. Loom’s Mac and PC app arrived in March 2019. In addition to its Pro service, the company — which today counts 80 employees — is now working on a product specifically targeted at large businesses dubbed Loom For Teams, which lets companies create a central library of videos and protects them with stricter security safeguards.

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TalentX Entertainment Hires A3 Artists’ Maxwell Mitcheson As VP And Head Of Talent

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TalentX Entertainment, the nascent digital talent management firm with roots in TikTok, has announced the latest hire to join its burgeoning team.

Former A3 Artists agent Maxwell Mitcheson has onboarded at TalentX as VP and head of its talent division, Deadline reports. Throughout his career as an agent, Mitcheson has helped clients — including Jordyn Jones, Lauren Giraldo, and Mark Dohner — land brand deals and navigate crossovers from the digital to the traditional entertainment worlds. At A3, Mitcheson also spearheaded the agency’s signings of top TikTok stars like Tayler Holder, Andre Swilley, and others.

“Maxwell’s unique skill set is very difficult to find,” TalentX CEO Warren Lentz said of the hiring in a statement. “His ability to both develop talent and build new brands will be a great asset for TalentX. He’s a true visionary as well as an executor.”

TalentX has also onboarded in recent months two former Gersh agents: Sean Stewart as digital talent director and Michael Senzer as VP of business development. The company has also forged partnerships in recent weeks with talent agency ICM, which will now represent TalentX’s clients in all areas, as well as esports conglomerate ReKTGlobal, with whom TalentX has partnered to launch a gamer-focused talent management unit dubbed TalentX Gaming.

TalentX, which was founded by three digital creators-turned-entrepreneurs — Tal Fishman, Jason Wilhelm, and Josh Richards — reps stars across myriad platforms, including TikTok creator collective Sway LA, whose six members reside in a swanky Bel Air mansion. The star-studded group has also garnered headlines in recent days due to the arrests of two of its members. All told, the Sway LA TikTok account has amassed a cool 3.2 million followers.

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How Social Media Usage Of Popular DIY Hashtags Has Changed

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One prominent–and useful–application of social video into today’s world is in the do-it-yourself arena. With just a quick search on YouTube or Instagram, one can uncover multitudes of videos explaining how to do everything from changing the oil in your car to cutting your own hair. And while many videos are informative, some are just plain fun to watch. Yeah, you may never actually attempt to make those lotus dumplings, but there’s something soothing about seeing them get made.

Influencer marketing platform CreatorIQ, which was recently recognized as a leader in the latest Forrester New Wave: Influencer Marketing Solutions report, looked at 12 of the most popular DIY hashtags used by Instagram creators with 50,000 or more followers to uncover trends: #diy, #handmade, #doityourself, #homedecor, #craft, #woodworking, #crafts, #decor, #homemade, #diycrafts, #diyhomedecor, and #maker.  

While you may assume that engagement around DIY content skyrocketed as people were quarantined at home during the coronavirus pandemic, that isn’t the case for all of the top hashtags.

The hashtags with consistent year-over-year-growth

Four hashtags had year-over-year increases across the board from January through May 20 compared to the same date range in 2019: #doityourself, #crafts, #diycrafts, and #diyhomedecor. 

Some specifics: #doityourself and #crafts saw their biggest year-over-year increases in May–45.10% and 19.07%, respectively–while both #diycrafts and #diyhomedecor saw their biggest increases in January (160.24% and 46.54%, respectively). 

In general, #diycrafts has been the breakout hashtag for 2020, with consistently large year-over-year increases each month so far this year, the biggest being the aforementioned 160.24% in January. Top accounts by engagement with this hashtag include @diyglaze, @selectdiyss, @usefuldiyss, @klyndiys, and @foodytap.

Looking at recent top #diycrafts videos by engagement, three of them come from @diyglaze:

https://www.instagram.com/p/B_5b6zQF0OU/

https://www.instagram.com/p/B_PIyhfF4RF/

Another top video came from @selectdiyss: 

https://www.instagram.com/p/B_-tg5_lpjM/

The hashtags that grew during #StayAtHome

Both the #homemade and #diy hashtags had year-over-year decreases in January and February this year, but both saw increases in March (when stay-at-home orders began to be issued due to the coronavirus pandemic) through May. 

For the #diy hashtag, starting in March it trended up with a 1.23% year-over-year increase in use. Then, in April, it saw a 15.12% year-over-year increase, and in May, a 23.50% year-over-year increase (as measured May 1-20). The top creators by engagements for #diy included @5.min.crafts, @diyselected, @fasttipsvideos, @diycraftsvideos and @diyglaze

Recent top #diy videos by engagements include: 

A clever tutorial on how to accurately draw a face: 

https://www.instagram.com/p/B-AbiGGpTXt/

A food-themed video: 

https://www.instagram.com/p/B_d-4VPHVIS/

Resin crafts: 

https://www.instagram.com/p/B-FXPEKBOYI/

For #homemade, the biggest increase was in April (a 73.55% increase compared to April 2019), with a 13.25% increase year-over-year in March and a 60.67% year-over-year increase in May. The top creators by engagements for #homemade include @arts.hub, @akis_petretzikis, @globalcreatived, @wiltoncakes, and @fixer_upper_before_and_after

Two of the top posts by engagement: 

https://www.instagram.com/p/B_asav8gK6h/

https://www.instagram.com/p/CACEMTTlo5M/

Which hashtags aren’t as popular this year

Three hashtags actually saw year-over-year decreases in engagement from January to May: #maker, #decor, and #woodworking. Two others, #handmade and #homedecor, had increases in January (15.67% and 17.70%, respectively) and February (3.37% and 8.43%), but declines from March to May. 

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Last-Click Coupons Have Dominated Affiliate Marketing For Years. Now, Brands Are Restrategizing With Influencers.

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Ad revenue slowdown caused by the pandemic has sparked a period of hyperspeed evolution for influencer marketing, says Brian Nickerson.

He would know–he’s the cofounder and CEO of MagicLinks, a marketing company that works with 19,000-plus creators and 3,000-plus brands. Its main business is providing influencers and companies with affiliate product links, but it also offers something it says is becoming increasingly crucial: accurate performance data for those links.

Affiliate links are, at their most basic, a tool to measure how much traffic a sponsored creator is driving to a brand. For example, a beauty guru may partner with a cosmetics company, and in his branded video, tell viewers to use his unique link if they want to check out the brand’s website. In some cases, affiliate links will earn creators cuts of sales based on how much product they move. But the links’ core purpose is to let brands know if their influencer investments paid off.

However, that’s not always as easy as it sounds.

“Basically, an influencer sends people to a brand, and then two-thirds of those people go look for a coupon right before they buy,” Nickerson says. It’s understandable that consumers–especially right now–would want to get a few bucks off any purchase they can, but entering a coupon code erases the connection between sale and creator. So that influencer, despite actually driving the purchase, loses credit for it to the discount or cashback site that provided the coupon.


A sponsored video from one of the influencers in MagicLinks’ network.

Although people may not automatically link creators and coupons, both are part of the affiliate marketing space.

Influencers are a first-click marketing strategy: they’re often the first point of contact between a consumer and a brand, and generate sales that probably wouldn’t have happened without them. Coupons, on the other hand, are a last-click strategy–as in, generally a consumer already knows about a brand and has already decided to make a purchase, and at the last minute goes looking for a discount.

Last-click strategies are the affiliate marketing space’s longstanding model; influencer marketing is the nascent entrant that’s struggled to catch on with brands used to allocating their budget to that last-click, Nickerson says. He estimates 85% of brands’ affiliate spend still goes toward last-click marketing (often in the form of cash kickbacks for coupon sites) and only 15% goes to influencers.

A significant part of influencer marketing’s struggle has been those last-click solutions, he adds. Because so much of influencers’ traffic is disrupted by things like coupons, affiliate link reporting tends to wildly overinflate the amount of sales truly driven by last-click marketing, and underrepresent the impact of influencers. MagicLinks has technology that allows it to integrate with brand partners’ sites and attribute affiliate sales to influencers even if buyers use a coupon–but that kind of accuracy isn’t common across the industry, it says. In 90% of campaigns it tracks, basic data shows the number of sales driven by influencers is “undercounted by a large amount,” Nickerson says.

Which means that brands simply aren’t seeing what influencers truly bring to partnerships.

“Brands institutionalized last-click partners before influencers existed, which has caused the industry to broadly overlook first-click value drivers like influencers,” Nickeson says. “Today, last-click sites mostly decrease margins. And the argument that, well, they helped close the sale…They’re not driving new people to the brand. They’re just sitting there right before someone checks out.”

Brands are pausing last-click spend—and increasing influencer investment

But now that the pandemic has steeply dropped ad revenues across all marketing industries and simultaneously driven more eyeballs than ever to online content, brands are reevaluating the importance of digital influencers.

“We’re living in a new world, and the disruption that actually started five years ago is now being accelerated as brands are forced to say, ‘Where do we get the most value and how do we measure and track that information? Who should we reward as we do that?’” Nickerson explains. “They’re having to decide between, ‘Okay, do we want to invest more in influencers or do we want to keep other affiliates?’ And I think it has progressed a lot faster, they’re realizing the influencers are who bring people to their site.”

That realization has driven changes for the brands and creators working with MagicLinks. In March and April, its network of influencers collectively saw a 110% growth in the number of sales they drove, the company says. On April 17, they collectively drove a combined dollar figure amount that was 26% higher than MagicLinks’ previous record sales day–Black Friday 2019.

Meanwhile, more than 400 of its partner brands have decreased or paused the amount they spend on last-click marketing. The company has also seen a 30% increase in brands tapping its influencer network for campaigns, MagicLinks says.

Sponsored content from another MagicLinks influencer.

With all of that in mind, it’s important to note influencer marketing is not immune to the economic effects of COVID-19. MagicLinks has seen some of its partner brands extend their payment periods—meaning they’ll take longer to pay influencers–and creators have previously told us they’re being offered fewer sponsorships. (Also, a bunch of YouTubers recently revealed just how far their CPMs have dropped.)

Still, Nickerson hopes that the crunch brands are dealing with now will prompt them to move forward with an increased willingness to invest in creators.

“Brands are recognizing influencers as the single most powerful source to bring consumers to their brand,” he says. “They’re making an investment into the marketing value of influencers who are helping drive brand recognition, loyalty, and repeat purchases.”

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Amid YouTube’s Pivot Away From Scripted Originals, Axed ‘Step Up’ Series Dances On At Starz

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Step Up: High Water, one of the first and biggest original series to herald YouTube’s original programming ambitions, has moved to Starz. The move comes as YouTube has largely pivoted away from high-budget scripted shows in favor of unscripted programming that takes an educational or musical bent, or that highlights native creators.

Step Up, a dance-themed series inspired by the hit film franchise starring Ne-Yo and Naya Rivera centered around a performing arts school in Atlanta, is owned by Starz’s corporate parent, Lionsgate, making for a synergistic move, notes The Hollywood Reporter.

The Reporter reports that Step Up (which ran for two seasons on YouTube) is the second project to find a new home after being cancelled by the Google-owned video giant. The Kirsten Dunst-starring feature On Becoming a God in Central Florida was also revived at pay channel Showtime. While a premiere date for the third season of Step Up has yet to be announced — which will add Tricia Helfer to the cast, and will see ‘High Water’ dropped from the title — the network will make the first two seasons of Step Up available in the meantime.

“The latest installment of Step Up not only reimagines the entire franchise but is filled with high energy, lots of heart, and electrifying dance moves, and we’re very excited to reunite the talented cast and creative teams for another great season,” Lionsgate Television Group chairman Kevin Beggs told the Reporter in a statement.

YouTube is now home to just two scripted originals, according to the Reporter, both of which are set to debut their third seasons: Cobra Kai, a sequel series to the famed Karate Kid film franchise, and Liza On Demand, a sitcom starring native YouTube star Liza Koshy.

The move away from scripted content arrived in tandem YouTube’s decision to place all original programming in front of its YouTube Premium paywall. In March, for instance, YouTube scrapped Impulse, a thriller about a 16-year-old girl from a small town grappling with sexual assault trauma who discovers she has the ability to teleport. The video giant has also axed Champaign ILL, Ryan Hansen Solves Crimes On Television, Sideswiped, Do You Want To See A Dead Body, Origin, and Overthinking With Kat & June.

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Marques Brownlee, Jake Roper, Michael Stevens Help YouTube Nab 5 Daytime Emmy Noms

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YouTube Originals has received some encouraging validation today in the form of five Daytime Emmy Award nominations.

In the ‘Outstanding Educational Or Informational Series’ category, YouTube was recognized for Jake Roper’s Could You Survive The Movies, which puts fictional movie concepts to the scientific test, and Glad You Asked, in which Vox journalists ventured to answer some of YouTube’s most-searched-for questions.

Marques Brownlee’s Retro Tech — exploring the greatest vintage tech-driven products — was nominated in the ‘Outstanding Special Class Series’ category; Mind Field: What Is the Scariest Thing? — a special episode of the larger Mind Field franchise exploring where fear comes from — was nominated for ‘Outstanding Writing For A Special Class Special’; and Stonewall Riots documentary Stonewall Outloud was nominated for ‘Outstanding Directing Special Class’.

The 47th Daytime Emmy Awards, hosted by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS), will air on CBS on June 26 at 8 pm ET. In the meantime, YouTube has also updated its dedicated ‘For Your Consideration’ channel to promote nominated series for prospective Emmy voters.

“We are beyond thrilled to see our original content be recognized by Academy members, particularly among a highly competitive pool of new programming,” Susanne Daniels, YouTube’s global head of original content, said in a statement. “This achievement wouldn’t have been possible without the creators, actors, writers, producers, and directors who passionately brought these truly fantastic series and specials to life.”

Though the Daytime Emmys are far less prestigious than their Primetime counterparts, these aren’t YouTube’s first Daytime nominations. In 2018, since-renamed YouTube Red received six nods, including three for Roman Atwood’s Day Dreams, and one apiece for Colin Furze‘s Furze World Wonders, VSauce‘s Mind Field, and Fruit Ninja Frenzy Force.

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Marques Brownlee, Jake Roper, Michael Stevens Help YouTube Nab 5 Daytime Emmy Noms

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YouTube Originals has received some encouraging validation today in the form of five Daytime Emmy Award nominations.

In the ‘Outstanding Educational Or Informational Series’ category, YouTube was recognized for Jake Roper’s Could You Survive The Movies, which puts fictional movie concepts to the scientific test, and Glad You Asked, in which Vox journalists ventured to answer some of YouTube’s most-searched-for questions.

Marques Brownlee’s Retro Tech — exploring the greatest vintage tech-driven products — was nominated in the ‘Outstanding Special Class Series’ category; Mind Field: What Is the Scariest Thing? — a special episode of the larger Mind Field franchise exploring where fear comes from — was nominated for ‘Outstanding Writing For A Special Class Special’; and Stonewall Riots documentary Stonewall Outloud was nominated for ‘Outstanding Directing Special Class’.

The 47th Daytime Emmy Awards, hosted by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS), will air on CBS on June 26 at 8 pm ET. In the meantime, YouTube has also updated its dedicated ‘For Your Consideration’ channel to promote nominated series for prospective Emmy voters.

“We are beyond thrilled to see our original content be recognized by Academy members, particularly among a highly competitive pool of new programming,” Susanne Daniels, YouTube’s global head of original content, said in a statement. “This achievement wouldn’t have been possible without the creators, actors, writers, producers, and directors who passionately brought these truly fantastic series and specials to life.”

Though the Daytime Emmys are far less prestigious than their Primetime counterparts, these aren’t YouTube’s first Daytime nominations. In 2018, since-renamed YouTube Red received six nods, including three for Roman Atwood’s Day Dreams, and one apiece for Colin Furze‘s Furze World Wonders, VSauce‘s Mind Field, and Fruit Ninja Frenzy Force.

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