How The NBA Has Approached Facebook Video Since Returning to the Court

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The NBA‘s restart last week was met with a lot of excitement–among players and fans, sure, but also from TV networks, which have been devoid of premium programming for months now without live sports. Everyone involved with the NBA has been looking for ways to engage with viewers despite a lack of games.

For several NBA teams, Facebook was a viable option to stay in front of fans. The Los Angeles Lakers, in particular, were impressive on that front, generating 185 million video views from March 12 to July 28, according to Tubular Labs. That was the most Facebook video views of any NBA franchise during the timeframe. Surprisingly, monthly views were also in line with the team’s averages during a regular season. The Golden State Warriors (110 million views) and the San Antonio Spurs (80 million) were the only other teams with more than 55 million views on the platform during the stretch.

Since live games restarted on July 30, the NBA has been very active in utilizing Facebook video. NBA-owned pages have earned 135 million views since July 30 on 2,129 uploads. The NBA’s primary page has the most views there, followed by the Lakers, NBA Philippines, NBA LATAM, the San Antonio Spurs, and the Sacramento Kings.

Notably, the NBA and its teams aren’t leaning exclusively on recent games and highlights. They’ve managed to mix that sort of content in with full-season highlight reels from quarantine as well. The Lakers have primarily moved toward individual plays and shining a spotlight on stars LeBron James and Anthony Davis. Since returning to play, the NBA’s top video is a quick highlight of LeBron’s defense leading a three-pointer (4.3 million views). James is also featured in five of the top 10 (some from the NBA itself, and others from the Lakers).

The NBA’s own videos have looked at top recent performances–like Giannis Antetokounmpo vs. Boston–while also featuring career highlights of players that have excelled since getting back on the court, as was the case for the Phoenix SunsDevon Booker. On some of the NBA’s regionally focused pages, the league has been creating short recaps of the season to date, in order to help catch up new and old fans before games restarted. The Spurs have worked with corporate partners like BMW to sponsor player highlights, while the Kings have activated with State Farm to emphasize each game’s top assist.

In that vein, 118 different brands have sponsored at least one NBA-owned Facebook video since July 30. The California Office of Traffic Safety has earned the most views with those (1.1 million, all through a deal with the Kings), while Lexus and Gatorade have sponsored the most videos (eight apiece). Among teams, the Houston Rockets have the most sponsored Facebook videos (38), but the Spurs have generated the most sponsored views at 4.2 million.

As the regular season wraps up in the bubble, video views (and sponsorship opportunities with those) only seem poised to increase as attention climbs.

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Rebecca Zamolo Launches Mobile Game Inspired By Hit ‘Game Master Network’ YouTube Series

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YouTube star Rebecca Zamolo, who has amassed roughly 15 million subscribers across her diverse portfolio of channels, is getting into the mobile gaming business.

On her eponymous channel (9.3 million subscribers, roughly 120 million monthly views), Zamolo shares challenges, while on a couple channel with husband Matt Slays (4.6 million subscribers, 55 million monthly views), the two share much of the same kind of content. The duo also operate Game Master Network (1.4 million subscribers, 15 million monthly views) — a real-life game that the couple likens to an escape room-meets-Amazing Race series — in which Zamolo and crew must solve clues and use their detective skills to defeat an antagonist known as the ‘YouTube Hacker’.

It is this latter channel that spawned Zamolo’s mobile gaming foray. Also titled The Game Master Network, the game was not only inspired by her series but also boasts exclusive integrations. Having been in the works for months, Zamolo partnered on the venture with digital product studio BoundaryLA.

Zamolo, 35, tells Tubefilter that the app — now available on both iOS and Android — won’t be monetized in any capacity, and was solely designed to keep her young fans entertained in quarantine.

In The Game Master Network, players play as Rebecca herself (pictured above), dashing and jumping through tunnels to retrieve collectibles prizes, including gems, puzzle pieces, and a lie detector mixture. These objects can unlock secret videos used to help solve clues in the larger Game Master Network YouTube series. The unlimited scroller — in which friends can also compete against one another for the longest run — is also tied to Zamolo’s YouTube series in that it notifies users of new videos upon their release.

“I’ve always loved escape rooms and the Game Master series came about after we bought a cabin and found a hidden underground space in our closet,” Zamolo tells Tubefilter. “It seemed like a natural next step to bring the game directly into the hands of our viewers.”

In addition to her family-friendly programming, Zamolo also released in 2018 a feature documentary about her battle with ulcerative colitis and inflammatory bowel disease that has raked in over 19 million views. She has also amassed a substantial following on other platforms, including 13.6 million fans on TikTok. And in terms of her business ventures, she operates a merch line with her mother-in-law and also launched a lip gloss collaboration with IGXO Cosmetics last year called #ZamFam.

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Continue Reading Rebecca Zamolo Launches Mobile Game Inspired By Hit ‘Game Master Network’ YouTube Series

Rebecca Zamolo Launches Mobile Game Inspired By Hit ‘Game Master Network’ YouTube Series

  • Post category:Other

YouTube star Rebecca Zamolo, who has amassed roughly 15 million subscribers across her diverse portfolio of channels, is getting into the mobile gaming business.

On her eponymous channel (9.3 million subscribers, roughly 120 million monthly views), Zamolo shares challenges, while on a couple channel with husband Matt Slays (4.6 million subscribers, 55 million monthly views), the two share much of the same kind of content. The duo also operate Game Master Network (1.4 million subscribers, 15 million monthly views) — a real-life game that the couple likens to an escape room-meets-Amazing Race series — in which Zamolo and crew must solve clues and use their detective skills to defeat an antagonist known as the ‘YouTube Hacker’.

It is this latter channel that spawned Zamolo’s mobile gaming foray. Also titled The Game Master Network, the game was not only inspired by her series but also boasts exclusive integrations. Having been in the works for months, Zamolo partnered on the venture with digital product studio BoundaryLA.

Zamolo, 35, tells Tubefilter that the app — now available on both iOS and Android — won’t be monetized in any capacity, and was solely designed to keep her young fans entertained in quarantine.

In The Game Master Network, players play as Rebecca herself (pictured above), dashing and jumping through tunnels to retrieve collectibles prizes, including gems, puzzle pieces, and a lie detector mixture. These objects can unlock secret videos used to help solve clues in the larger Game Master Network YouTube series. The unlimited scroller — in which friends can also compete against one another for the longest run — is also tied to Zamolo’s YouTube series in that it notifies users of new videos upon their release.

“I’ve always loved escape rooms and the Game Master series came about after we bought a cabin and found a hidden underground space in our closet,” Zamolo tells Tubefilter. “It seemed like a natural next step to bring the game directly into the hands of our viewers.”

In addition to her family-friendly programming, Zamolo also released in 2018 a feature documentary about her battle with ulcerative colitis and inflammatory bowel disease that has raked in over 19 million views. She has also amassed a substantial following on other platforms, including 13.6 million fans on TikTok. And in terms of her business ventures, she operates a merch line with her mother-in-law and also launched a lip gloss collaboration with IGXO Cosmetics last year called #ZamFam.

Visit Tubefilter for more great stories.

Source: TubeFilter.com

Continue Reading Rebecca Zamolo Launches Mobile Game Inspired By Hit ‘Game Master Network’ YouTube Series

2 More Bon Appétit Hosts Depart YouTube Channel, With Video Production Set To Resume In September

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Two more Bon Appétit YouTube personalities have departed the Condé Nast title’s massively popular ‘Test Kitchen’ series.

Gaby Melian (pictured above) and Molly Baz announced in social posts that they will no longer be appearing on Bon Appétit‘s YouTube channel. Those departures arrived shortly after three Test Kitchen staffers of color — Sohla El-Waylly, Priya Krishna, and Rick Martinez — tendered their own departures after months of unsuccessful contract negotiations, which were sparked by allegations of racism within the company in June. The popular YouTube channel has been dormant ever since.

“After weeks of negotiations, [Condé Nast’s video division] Condé Nast Entertainment is not meeting my expectations regarding the plans to have a more diverse and inclusive video program,” Melian shared on Instagram. “For that reason, I will not be signing a contract with them to appear in videos.”

Melian, like all of her colleagues, will continue to work for Bon Appétit in another capacity — in her case, continuing to serve as the Test Kitchen manager — though she will be steering clear of video appearances. El-Waylly will continue to create editorial content for the culinary giant’s titular magazine and website, while Krishna and Martinez will serve as freelancers. In her statement, Baz said she’d “continue to work at the magazine as it rebuilds (which is a separate entity from CNE).”

Amid the departures, Condé Nast sent a memo to Bon Appétit staffers on Friday, which was obtained by The Wrap.

In the memo, Condé Nast’s chief people officer, Stan Duncan, said the title hoped to announce a new editor in chief in coming weeks, following the resignation of former editor Adam Rapoport after photos resurfaced in June showing him in brownface. Last week, the company also hired Eater‘s Sonia Chopra as its new executive editor.

Duncan added that while the company needed “to do a better job building understanding and consistency across our video compensation policies,” a monthlong investigation conducted by an independent firm ultimately concluded that staffers were being compensated fairly for their video appearances — either through their full-time salaries, as part of a project, or through their freelance agreements. The investigation also found no evidence to suggest that race played a factor in compensation, Duncan wrote. Going forward, Bon Appétit will use a standardized video compensation rate card for all freelance and salaried staff.

“We are planning for BA video production to begin in September with some returning talent, in addition to new contributors which we’ll be announcing in the coming weeks,” Duncan wrote. “We are sorry to see some of our video contributors part ways, but we feel that we cannot break the standard compensation rates we’ve set across our teams now in order to keep them, as some have been requesting.”

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Hey Creators, Are Your Viral Parties Really Worth the Risk?

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So you’re a creator that’s been in lockdown for months and you get invited to a party that we have all heard about. You go, and you have such an amazing time hanging out with your friends that you do what you do best, you film it and upload it to your platform of choice. The views start rolling in, and a huge number of your fans not only see the fun you’re having, but they also see you’ve made the decision to break free from the pandemic rules. Hey, if you can party like there’s no tomorrow, perhaps they can too, except there may not be a tomorrow.

As a result, one of your viewers follows your lead and, unfortunately, contracts COVID-19. They then transmit it to their grandparent who lives with them. The grandparent passes away. Distraught by the results of their actions, your fan reaches out to you and says that seeing your video is the reason they decided to party with their friends. How are you going to deal with that? Knowing that your actions had very real consequences?

View Counts Have A Way Of Obscuring The Human Cost Of Your Actions

The COVID-19 pandemic is still very real, but you wouldn’t know that from some of the content being created now. As a creator or influencer, or whatever you would like to call yourself, you have a responsibility not only yourself but to your fans, employees, friends, and family to not be publishing any content on any platform showing you flouting the rules that everyone else has to follow. That means openly attending or hosting parties, refusing to wear a face mask, and not adhering to the CDC / WHO guidelines.

I’m not saying this is an easy change to make. YouTube reported that ad revenue on the platform dropped by $3.8 billion in Q2, which translates into lost revenue for content creators, missed meet-ups, and canceled events. But the fight for viewers and revenue doesn’t mean you must sacrifice your beliefs or risk the lives of your viewers and fellow creators.

It is easy to forget how many people look up to you. In many cases, your audience may  look like views on a video or story, but these are real people. I work with creators, many of whom forget there are actual people behind those numbers. The numbers and power of your influence are truly remarkable.

If you want to understand the scope of how many lives you affect, then think about it this way:

You have 1 million subs/views/likes/comments on your content in the last 28 days. That may be a small number compared to your channel, but just go with me on it. Let’s pick Madison Square Garden:

That is a sold out show at MSG – the maximum amount of people MSG can hold: 20,789. Yeah, that’s it.

That means that if we take your million subs/ views / likes/ comments in just 28 days you filled 48 Madison Square Gardens. Look at that picture and try to imagine 48 of those filled with people watching you.

As a creator, you have a decision to make. Do you want to be part of the solution or part of the problem? You may argue that’s not your problem, that you cannot control your fans. And you are absolutely correct. But you can control what you upload and say. You have the ability to save lives.

Following Best Practices Around Social Distancing Is More Than Good Ethics, It’s Good Business

I hope the above gives you more perspective on what you are dealing with. Hearing people say, “I just want to live my life” is not an excuse when by your actions, you “just wanting to live your life” may be taking someone else’s away. You have a responsibility to your fans to set an example. Because sooner or later, some of you will come to the realization that you enabled someone who did not deserve to die.

We are all having a hard time adjusting to this “new normal” and want it to be over. I think everyone can agree with that sentiment. This desire to move on and just get over it is seen in stories highlighting illegal gatherings and “COVID” parties. The creators at the center of these stories have risked their lives–and the lives of their viewers–along with their livelihoods through their actions. If you really wanted this over with, you would use your influence to slow the spread so things can get back to normal. Your actions are just the opposite.

Furthermore, you are in business, you get money for people watching, buying merch, brand deals, etc., how are your fans, with massive unemployment going to afford to buy any of your merch? How are brands and companies going to make enough money to stay afloat to even be able to offer you brand deals? They will not. And you will not be making the money you deserve for your hard work, if we do not get COVID under control.

You now have more reach than most companies, especially when it comes to younger viewers who are also the people contracting COVID-19 at higher rates now.  By setting the example and not having parties or getting together and sharing it, or better yet, condemning it, you are actually helping your business – including human kind. You have 48 Madison Square Gardens of people that could listen to you. Why not use your influence to tell them to stay inside so we all can get back to some sort of normalcy.

Adapting To This New Normal Requires A New Attitude

This “new normal” whatever it is going to be, is going to be hard, and right now, it is hard to even deal with on a daily basis. All my clients I talk to are struggling, and I know you are too. We are in this together. We are all scared. But ignoring the pandemic, and pretending everything is “normal” is ignorant. It is not going to help you or the world.

Business Insider had a great article in early July where they talked with Dr. Christina Ghaly, Los Angeles County’s director of health services. Who said “”If you’re an influencer or have the ability to influence people in any space whether you’re a celebrity or on the internet — whatever your sphere of influence — please take that responsibility seriously… …Please use that as a chance to be a role model.”

I am not asking you to suffer any more than you already have. Nor am I asking you to stop making content that makes millions of people happy. You are a creator. You are a leader. Time to get creative on how to adjust to being safe and spreading that message. If you need help with navigating this unprecedented time, how to integrate being safe, but still making kick-ass content, reach out, that is my job, to help you.

Bottom line: If you are out or having parties and posting it, you are killing people. Be ready to deal with the consequences of that.


Josh is an ICF Certified Life Coach and the founder of Creator Coach, the first-ever life coach dedicated exclusively to creators, and now the people that surround them. He’s helped clients who have a reach of over 2+ billion viewers across all platforms. And he has been featured in The New York Times, Slate, ForbesTubeFilter, 6 Feet Apart with Alex Wagner (NBC and ShowTime), where Alex stated: “We all need a Josh Zimmerman Life Coach in our lives…”, moderated panels for Playlist Live, Patreon, and VidConNow. You can learn more about him by visiting his website: www.creatorcoach.com

Visit Tubefilter for more great stories.


Source: TubeFilter.com

Continue Reading Hey Creators, Are Your Viral Parties Really Worth the Risk?

Hey Creators, Are Your Viral Parties Really Worth the Risk?

  • Post category:Other

So you’re a creator that’s been in lockdown for months and you get invited to a party that we have all heard about. You go, and you have such an amazing time hanging out with your friends that you do what you do best, you film it and upload it to your platform of choice. The views start rolling in, and a huge number of your fans not only see the fun you’re having, but they also see you’ve made the decision to break free from the pandemic rules. Hey, if you can party like there’s no tomorrow, perhaps they can too, except there may not be a tomorrow.

As a result, one of your viewers follows your lead and, unfortunately, contracts COVID-19. They then transmit it to their grandparent who lives with them. The grandparent passes away. Distraught by the results of their actions, your fan reaches out to you and says that seeing your video is the reason they decided to party with their friends. How are you going to deal with that? Knowing that your actions had very real consequences?

View Counts Have A Way Of Obscuring The Human Cost Of Your Actions

The COVID-19 pandemic is still very real, but you wouldn’t know that from some of the content being created now. As a creator or influencer, or whatever you would like to call yourself, you have a responsibility not only yourself but to your fans, employees, friends, and family to not be publishing any content on any platform showing you flouting the rules that everyone else has to follow. That means openly attending or hosting parties, refusing to wear a face mask, and not adhering to the CDC / WHO guidelines.

I’m not saying this is an easy change to make. YouTube reported that ad revenue on the platform dropped by $3.8 billion in Q2, which translates into lost revenue for content creators, missed meet-ups, and canceled events. But the fight for viewers and revenue doesn’t mean you must sacrifice your beliefs or risk the lives of your viewers and fellow creators.

It is easy to forget how many people look up to you. In many cases, your audience may  look like views on a video or story, but these are real people. I work with creators, many of whom forget there are actual people behind those numbers. The numbers and power of your influence are truly remarkable.

If you want to understand the scope of how many lives you affect, then think about it this way:

You have 1 million subs/views/likes/comments on your content in the last 28 days. That may be a small number compared to your channel, but just go with me on it. Let’s pick Madison Square Garden:

That is a sold out show at MSG – the maximum amount of people MSG can hold: 20,789. Yeah, that’s it.

That means that if we take your million subs/ views / likes/ comments in just 28 days you filled 48 Madison Square Gardens. Look at that picture and try to imagine 48 of those filled with people watching you.

As a creator, you have a decision to make. Do you want to be part of the solution or part of the problem? You may argue that’s not your problem, that you cannot control your fans. And you are absolutely correct. But you can control what you upload and say. You have the ability to save lives.

Following Best Practices Around Social Distancing Is More Than Good Ethics, It’s Good Business

I hope the above gives you more perspective on what you are dealing with. Hearing people say, “I just want to live my life” is not an excuse when by your actions, you “just wanting to live your life” may be taking someone else’s away. You have a responsibility to your fans to set an example. Because sooner or later, some of you will come to the realization that you enabled someone who did not deserve to die.

We are all having a hard time adjusting to this “new normal” and want it to be over. I think everyone can agree with that sentiment. This desire to move on and just get over it is seen in stories highlighting illegal gatherings and “COVID” parties. The creators at the center of these stories have risked their lives–and the lives of their viewers–along with their livelihoods through their actions. If you really wanted this over with, you would use your influence to slow the spread so things can get back to normal. Your actions are just the opposite.

Furthermore, you are in business, you get money for people watching, buying merch, brand deals, etc., how are your fans, with massive unemployment going to afford to buy any of your merch? How are brands and companies going to make enough money to stay afloat to even be able to offer you brand deals? They will not. And you will not be making the money you deserve for your hard work, if we do not get COVID under control.

You now have more reach than most companies, especially when it comes to younger viewers who are also the people contracting COVID-19 at higher rates now.  By setting the example and not having parties or getting together and sharing it, or better yet, condemning it, you are actually helping your business – including human kind. You have 48 Madison Square Gardens of people that could listen to you. Why not use your influence to tell them to stay inside so we all can get back to some sort of normalcy.

Adapting To This New Normal Requires A New Attitude

This “new normal” whatever it is going to be, is going to be hard, and right now, it is hard to even deal with on a daily basis. All my clients I talk to are struggling, and I know you are too. We are in this together. We are all scared. But ignoring the pandemic, and pretending everything is “normal” is ignorant. It is not going to help you or the world.

Business Insider had a great article in early July where they talked with Dr. Christina Ghaly, Los Angeles County’s director of health services. Who said “”If you’re an influencer or have the ability to influence people in any space whether you’re a celebrity or on the internet — whatever your sphere of influence — please take that responsibility seriously… …Please use that as a chance to be a role model.”

I am not asking you to suffer any more than you already have. Nor am I asking you to stop making content that makes millions of people happy. You are a creator. You are a leader. Time to get creative on how to adjust to being safe and spreading that message. If you need help with navigating this unprecedented time, how to integrate being safe, but still making kick-ass content, reach out, that is my job, to help you.

Bottom line: If you are out or having parties and posting it, you are killing people. Be ready to deal with the consequences of that.


Josh is an ICF Certified Life Coach and the founder of Creator Coach, the first-ever life coach dedicated exclusively to creators, and now the people that surround them. He’s helped clients who have a reach of over 2+ billion viewers across all platforms. And he has been featured in The New York Times, Slate, ForbesTubeFilter, 6 Feet Apart with Alex Wagner (NBC and ShowTime), where Alex stated: “We all need a Josh Zimmerman Life Coach in our lives…”, moderated panels for Playlist Live, Patreon, and VidConNow. You can learn more about him by visiting his website: www.creatorcoach.com

Visit Tubefilter for more great stories.

Source: TubeFilter.com

Continue Reading Hey Creators, Are Your Viral Parties Really Worth the Risk?

Half A Million People Watched Dr. DisRespect’s First Post-Permaban Live Stream On YouTube

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More than 500,000 people tuned in for Dr. DisRespect’s first live stream since he was banned from Twitch in late June.

The 38-year-old streamer (real name Guy Beahm) went live this afternoon on YouTube, and spent an hour fielding questions from viewers before streaming Call of Duty gameplay.

Unsurprisingly, chief among viewers’ queries was why Beahm was abruptly and apparently unappealably shut out of Twitch. Prior to his ban, he was one of the platform’s most prominent partner creators, fresh off signing a reported multimillion-dollar deal to stream there exclusively for years to come. Beahm appeared to receive news of his incoming ban on camera; the final moments of his last Twitch stream show him getting a message on his phone, becoming visibly distressed, and ending the broadcast without warning. Shortly after, he released a statement saying he didn’t know why Twitch had banned him.

Today, he said that still hasn’t changed. “In regards to the ban, there’s a lot of people that want to know what happened,” he told viewers. “Guess what? I want you to look me in my f—–g eyes when I say this: We still have no idea. We have no idea.”

He mocked people who claimed he’s lying, calling them “a bunch of phonies,” then added, “As far as I’m concerned, we didn’t do anything to warrant a ban, let alone how they went about banning us. No communication before, no reaching out, nothing. Boom. Done…I think it’s a f—–g cockroach approach. Period. Last thing I’m gonna say about it.”

Beahm went on to say that he doesn’t want to speak about it publicly because his “legal professionals” are doing “what they need to do.” He did seem to confirm that his deal with Twitch was valuable: “You’re talking about a heavy contract. Lots of money. I got a mansion with an infinity pool and geysers that come out of cement tiles every time you walk. It has LED lights. There’s big money involved.”

As for whether Beahm is streaming on YouTube because of a signed deal, that doesn’t seem likely. After Beahm linked to the channel yesterday, hinting at a return, people noticed he had activated Channel Memberships–something only creators in the YouTube Partner Program can do–and theorized that he’s YouTube Gaming’s newest exclusive streamer. But unlike at Twitch, Beahm can be a YouTube Partner without having an actual YouTube Gaming contract.

During the broadcast, Beahm indicated his move to YouTube was spontaneous. “What are we playing today? I don’t know. What are we talking about? I don’t know. Why am I livestreaming right now? I don’t know. I just thought I’d start a stream up,” he said.

Beahm likely isn’t able to sign with a new platform until his Twitch deal has been untangled, but just in case, Tubefilter has reached out to YouTube to ask if Beahm has a contract with it. We’ll update this story with any new information.

Visit Tubefilter for more great stories.

Source: TubeFilter.com

Continue Reading Half A Million People Watched Dr. DisRespect’s First Post-Permaban Live Stream On YouTube

Half A Million People Watched Dr. DisRespect’s First Post-Permaban Live Stream On YouTube

  • Post category:Other

More than 500,000 people tuned in for Dr. DisRespect’s first live stream since he was banned from Twitch in late June.

The 38-year-old streamer (real name Guy Beahm) went live this afternoon on YouTube, and spent an hour fielding questions from viewers before streaming Call of Duty gameplay.

Unsurprisingly, chief among viewers’ queries was why Beahm was abruptly and apparently unappealably shut out of Twitch. Prior to his ban, he was one of the platform’s most prominent partner creators, fresh off signing a reported multimillion-dollar deal to stream there exclusively for years to come. Beahm appeared to receive news of his incoming ban on camera; the final moments of his last Twitch stream show him getting a message on his phone, becoming visibly distressed, and ending the broadcast without warning. Shortly after, he released a statement saying he didn’t know why Twitch had banned him.

Today, he said that still hasn’t changed. “In regards to the ban, there’s a lot of people that want to know what happened,” he told viewers. “Guess what? I want you to look me in my f—–g eyes when I say this: We still have no idea. We have no idea.”

He mocked people who claimed he’s lying, calling them “a bunch of phonies,” then added, “As far as I’m concerned, we didn’t do anything to warrant a ban, let alone how they went about banning us. No communication before, no reaching out, nothing. Boom. Done…I think it’s a f—–g cockroach approach. Period. Last thing I’m gonna say about it.”

Beahm went on to say that he doesn’t want to speak about it publicly because his “legal professionals” are doing “what they need to do.” He did seem to confirm that his deal with Twitch was valuable: “You’re talking about a heavy contract. Lots of money. I got a mansion with an infinity pool and geysers that come out of cement tiles every time you walk. It has LED lights. There’s big money involved.”

As for whether Beahm is streaming on YouTube because of a signed deal, that doesn’t seem likely. After Beahm linked to the channel yesterday, hinting at a return, people noticed he had activated Channel Memberships–something only creators in the YouTube Partner Program can do–and theorized that he’s YouTube Gaming’s newest exclusive streamer. But unlike at Twitch, Beahm can be a YouTube Partner without having an actual YouTube Gaming contract.

During the broadcast, Beahm indicated his move to YouTube was spontaneous. “What are we playing today? I don’t know. What are we talking about? I don’t know. Why am I livestreaming right now? I don’t know. I just thought I’d start a stream up,” he said.

Beahm likely isn’t able to sign with a new platform until his Twitch deal has been untangled, but just in case, Tubefilter has reached out to YouTube to ask if Beahm has a contract with it. We’ll update this story with any new information.

Visit Tubefilter for more great stories.


Source: TubeFilter.com

Continue Reading Half A Million People Watched Dr. DisRespect’s First Post-Permaban Live Stream On YouTube

DigiTour Co-Founder Meridith Rojas Named Logitech’s Global Head Of Creator Marketing

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Noted digital media entrepreneur Meridith Rojas has joined Swiss computer peripherals manufacturer Logitech as its global head of creator marketing.

In this role, Rojas — who co-founded and served as CEO of DigiTour, a producer of live events featuring social media talent — will focus on helping to shape Logitech’s relationships with Gen Z, working with gaming and entertainment brands and tapping into her longstanding relationships with digital creators. In addition to driving creator marketing initiatives, Rojas will be tasked with identifying key partnerships alongside both established and aspiring creators, and seeking to better understand how Logitech can support their needs.

Rojas will report to Vincet Borel, GM of Logitech’s new business group.

Logitech notes that creators have been an crucial component of its marketing efforts, given that many creators harness its gear and software. Most recently, the company teamed with several creators — including makeup artist Kimberly Margarita, musician Yvette Young, and gamer Meg Kaylee — on a campaign called #StartAFollowing. Logitech G, a division dedicated to gaming products, also hosts a monthly series called #CreatorSpotlight that aims to build a more diverse and inclusive gaming community.

“I’m excited to join a company like Logitech that embraces creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship,” Rojas said in a statement. “I feel it’s a place I can build and grow and hopefully make a dent. Logitech and I share a commitment to supporting and empowering the creator community — I look forward to what’s ahead.”

As she joins Logitech, Rojas will continue to serve as entrepreneur-in-residence at Columbia Records, where she helped launch the kid and influencer-focused music brand Jam Jr., and also helped incubate girl group Run The World. She has also helped Columbia launch national partnerships with Walmart, tween girls’ clother Justice, and The Girl Scouts.

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Continue Reading DigiTour Co-Founder Meridith Rojas Named Logitech’s Global Head Of Creator Marketing

DigiTour Co-Founder Meridith Rojas Named Logitech’s Global Head Of Creator Marketing

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Noted digital media entrepreneur Meridith Rojas has joined Swiss computer peripherals manufacturer Logitech as its global head of creator marketing.

In this role, Rojas — who co-founded and served as CEO of DigiTour, a producer of live events featuring social media talent — will focus on helping to shape Logitech’s relationships with Gen Z, working with gaming and entertainment brands and tapping into her longstanding relationships with digital creators. In addition to driving creator marketing initiatives, Rojas will be tasked with identifying key partnerships alongside both established and aspiring creators, and seeking to better understand how Logitech can support their needs.

Rojas will report to Vincet Borel, GM of Logitech’s new business group.

Logitech notes that creators have been an crucial component of its marketing efforts, given that many creators harness its gear and software. Most recently, the company teamed with several creators — including makeup artist Kimberly Margarita, musician Yvette Young, and gamer Meg Kaylee — on a campaign called #StartAFollowing. Logitech G, a division dedicated to gaming products, also hosts a monthly series called #CreatorSpotlight that aims to build a more diverse and inclusive gaming community.

“I’m excited to join a company like Logitech that embraces creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship,” Rojas said in a statement. “I feel it’s a place I can build and grow and hopefully make a dent. Logitech and I share a commitment to supporting and empowering the creator community — I look forward to what’s ahead.”

As she joins Logitech, Rojas will continue to serve as entrepreneur-in-residence at Columbia Records, where she helped launch the kid and influencer-focused music brand Jam Jr., and also helped incubate girl group Run The World. She has also helped Columbia launch national partnerships with Walmart, tween girls’ clother Justice, and The Girl Scouts.

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Source: TubeFilter.com

Continue Reading DigiTour Co-Founder Meridith Rojas Named Logitech’s Global Head Of Creator Marketing